Pride and prejudice, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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Roberts Brothers, 1892
157 Reviews
  

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Just love the storytelling and her beautiful writing. - Goodreads
And the ending still gets to me every time. - Goodreads
One exceedingly charming love story suffices greatly. - Goodreads
Pride and Prejudice is more than a love story. - Goodreads
The writing, for one, is superb. - Goodreads
... now theres a love story... - Goodreads

Review: Pride and Prejudice

User Review  - Katrina Passick Lumsden - Goodreads

I heartily enjoy period romance. Jane Austen's particular style of writing, however, leaves me a bit cold. It's a rule that writers are supposed to write what they know. If Austen stayed true to that ... Read full review

Review: Pride and Prejudice

User Review  - Katie Horning - Goodreads

I have read this book several times - one of my favorites! It is enjoyable and easy to read, with formidable characters and a charming storyline that carries the reader right through to the end. Simply delightful :) Read full review

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Contents

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Page 82 - She had never seen a place for which nature had done more, or where natural beauty had been so little counteracted by an awkward taste.
Page 242 - Not so hasty, if you please. I have by no means done. To all the objections I have already urged I have still another to add. I am no stranger to the particulars of your youngest sister's infamous elopement. I know it all : that the young man's marrying her was a patched-up business, at the expense of your father and uncle.
Page 236 - Longbourn to see me and my family," said Elizabeth coolly, " will be rather a confirmation of it if, indeed, such a report is in existence.
Page 243 - Neither duty, nor honor, nor gratitude," replied Elizabeth, " has any possible claim on me, in the present instance. No principle of either would be violated by my marriage with Mr. Darcy. And with regard to the resentment of his family, or the indignation of the world, if the former were excited by his marrying me, it would not give me one moment's concern; and the world in general would have too much sense to join in the scorn.
Page 43 - Poor Charlotte! it was melancholy to leave her to such society! But she had chosen it with her eyes open ; and though evidently regretting that her visitors were to go, she did not seem to ask for compassion. Her home and her housekeeping, her parish and her poultry, and all their dependent concerns, had not yet lost their charms.
Page 176 - ... information, and knowledge of the world, she must have received benefit of greater importance. But no such happy marriage could now teach the admiring multitude what connubial felicity really was. An union of a different tendency, and precluding the possibility of the other, was soon to be formed in their family. How Wickham and Lydia were to be supported in tolerable independence, she could not imagine. But how little of permanent happiness could belong to a couple who were only brought together...
Page 271 - I know your disposition, Lizzy. I know that you could be neither happy nor respectable unless you truly esteemed your husband unless you looked up to him as a superior. Your lively talents would place you in the greatest danger in an unequal marriage. You could scarcely escape discredit and misery. My child, let me not have the grief of seeing you unable to respect your, partner in life.
Page 66 - In Lydia's imagination, a visit to Brighton comprised every possibility of earthly happiness. She saw, with the creative eye of fancy, the streets of that gay bathing-place covered with officers. She saw herself the object of attention to tens and to scores of them at present unknown. She saw all the glories of the camp its tents stretched forth in beauteous uniformity of lines, crowded with the young and the gay, and dazzling with scarlet; and, to complete the view, she saw herself seated beneath...
Page 255 - Elizabeth, feeling all the more than common awkwardness and anxiety of his situation, now forced herself to speak; and immediately, though not very fluently, gave him to understand that her sentiments had undergone so material a change, since the period to which he alluded, as to make her receive with gratitude and pleasure his present assurances. The happiness which this reply produced, was such as he had probably never felt before; and he expressed himself on the occasion as sensibly and as warmly...
Page 72 - Her father captivated by youth and beauty, and that appearance of good humour, which youth and beauty generally give, had married a woman whose weak understanding and illiberal mind, had very early in their marriage put an end to all real affection for her.

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