Little Heroes

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Bantam Books, 1987 - Fiction - 486 pages
5 Reviews
In the near future Glorianna O'Toole is assigned to a project to create a computerized rock star, but members of the Reality Liberation Front have their own plans for the projects

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The future of sex and drugs and rock & roll is the topic of discussion here. Despite a typically gritty and powerful effort from Mr. Spinrad it became somewhat repetitive toward the middle of the book and the final scene was dissapoiting. It is also somewhat dated by references to modems, rather than an internet, but the quality of the writing allowed that point to slide by in my opinion.
The book seemed to be somewhat limited in scope as well, with the whole world of the characters somewhat obsessed with sex and drugs and rock & roll.
Readability (4/5)
Quality (2.5/5)
 

Review: Little Heroes

User Review  - Paul Sabourin-hertzog - Goodreads

There's a lot in here that was right up my alley. It's a dystopian punk novel, based around the music industry. I really enjoyed parts of it, and then found myself disconnected from parts of it. It's ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
11
Section 3
28
Copyright

24 other sections not shown

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About the author (1987)

HARLAN ELLlSON(r) has been characterized by The New York Times Book Review as having "the spellbinding quality of a great nonstop talker, with a cultural warehouse for a mind." The Los Angeles Times suggested, "It's long past time for Harlan Ellison to be awarded the title: 20th century Lewis Carroll." And the Washington Post Book World said simply, "One of the great living American short story writers." He has written or edited 100 books; more than 1700 stories, essays, articles, and newspaper columns; two dozen teleplays, for which he received the Writers Guild of America most outstanding teleplay award for solo work an unprecedented 4 times; and a dozen movies. Publishers Weekly called him "Highly Intellectual." (Ellison's response: "Who, Me?"). He won the Mystery Writers of America Edgar Allan Poe award twice, the Horror Writers Association Bram Stoker award 6 times (including The Lifetime Achievement Award in 1996), the Nebula award of the Science Fiction Writers of America 4 times, the Hugo (World Convention Achievement award) 8 1/2 times, and received the Silver Pen for Journalism from P.E.N. Not to mention the World Fantasy Award; the British Fantasy Award; the American Mystery Award; plus 2 Audie Awards and 2 Grammy nominations for Spoken Word recordings. He created great fantasies for the 1985 CBS revival of The Twilight Zone and The Outer Limits, traveled with The Rolling Stones; marched with Martin Luther King from Selma to Montgomery; created roles for Buster Keaton, Wally Cox, Gloria Swanson, and nearly 100 other stars on Burke's Law; ran with a kid gang in Brooklyn's Red Hook to get background for his first novel; covered race riots in Chicago's "back of the yards" with the late James Baldwin; sang with, and dined with, Maurice Chevalier; once stood off the son of the Detroit Mafia kingpin with a Remington XP-l00 pistol-rifle, while wearing nothing but a bath towel; sued Paramount and ABC-TV for plagiarism and won $337,000. His most recent legal victory, in protection of copyright against global Internet piracy of writers' work-a four-year-long litigation against AOL et al.-has resulted in revolutionizing protection of creative properties on the web. (As promised, he repaid hundreds of contributions [totaling $50,000] from the KICK Internet Piracy support fund.) But the bottom line, as voiced by Booklist, is this: "One thing for sure: the man can write." He lives with his wife, Susan, inside The Lost Aztec Temple of Mars, in Los Angeles.

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