Cousin Henry (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Digireads.com Publishing, 1993 - Fiction - 166 pages
16 Reviews
Despite a decreasing popularity throughout his career, Anthony Trollope (1815-1882) has become one of the most notable and respected English novelists of the Victorian Era. His penetrating novels on political, social and gender issues of his day have placed him among such nineteenth century literary icons as Jane Austen, Charles Dickens and George Eliot. Trollope penned 47 novels in his career, in addition to various short stories, travel books and biographies. "Cousin Henry" was first published in 1879, and has been called one of Trollope's more experimental short novels. Protagonist Indefer Jones is forced to choose an heir to his estate due to his ailing health. Jones is torn between logic and social conventions to choose the heir, as the obvious candidate happens to be his niece, but tradition dictates that it should be a man that shares his surname. The tale follows the conflict between heirs, and the dramatic happenings that ensue.
  

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Review: Cousin Henry

User Review  - Ghaggard - Goodreads

I enjoyed this book. An interesting tale with a deep description of Cousin Henry and his situation. I always think Trollope should have had a good editor, but I enjoy his books just the same. A quick read. Read full review

Review: Cousin Henry

User Review  - Kate Smith - Goodreads

Enjoyable read and fascinating to have the central character as someone that you don't like and the cause of all the trouble! Read full review

Contents

Uncle Indefer
5
Isabel Brodrick
9
Cousin Henry
13
The Squires Death
18
Preparing for the Funeral
22
Mr Apjohns Explanation
26
Looking for the Will
30
The Reading of the Will
35
An Action for Libel
61
Cousin Henry Makes Another Attempt
66
Again at Hereford
70
Mr Cheekey
74
Cousin Henry Goes to Carmarthen
79
Mr Apjohn Sends for Assistance
83
Doubts
88
Mr Apjohns Success
92

Alone at Llanfeare
39
Cousin Henry Dreams a Dream
43
Isabel at Hereford
47
Mr Owen
52
The Carmarthen Herald
57
How Cousin Henry Was Let Off Easily
96
Isabels Petition
101
Conclusion
105
Copyright

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About the author (1993)

Novelist Anthony Trollope was born in London, England on April 24, 1815. He attended many famous schools but as a large, awkward boy, he never felt in place among the aristocrats he met there. In 1834, he became a junior clerk in the General Post Office, London. He spent seven years there in poverty until his transfer, in 1841, to Banagher, Ireland as a deputy postal surveyor. He became more financially secure and in 1844, he married Rose Heseltine. He wanted to discover the reasons for Irish discontent. In 1843, he began working on his first novel The Macdermots of Ballycloran which was published in 1847. He was sent on many postal missions. He spent a year is Belfast, in 1853, then went to Donnybrook, near Dublin. He also went to Egypt, Scotland and the West Indies to finally settle outside of London, at Waltham Cross, as a surveyor general in the Post Office. At this point, he was writing constantly. Some of the writings during this time were The Noble Jilt, Barchester Towers, and The Last Chronicle of Barset. In 1867, he tried editorship of St. Paul's Magazine but soon gave up because he didn't feel suited for the job. In 1871, he went on a visit to a son in Australia. At sea, he wrote Lady Anna on the voyage out and Australia and New Zealand on the voyage back. The Autobiography was written between October 1875 and April 1876 but was not published until after his death. Suffering from asthma and possible angina pectoris, he moved to Harting Grange. He wrote three more novels during 1881 than, in 1882, went to Ireland to begin research for The Landleaguers. In November that year, he suffered a paralytic stroke and he died on December 6, 1882.

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