A New and General Biographical Dictionary: Containing an Historical and Critical Account of the Lives and Writings of the Most Eminent Persons in Every Nation, Particularly the British and Irish, from the Earliest Accounts of Time to the Present Period : Wherein Their Remarkable Actions Or Sufferings, Their Virtues, Parts, and Learning are Accurately Displayed : with a Catalogue of Their Literary Productions, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

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T. Osborne, J. Whiston and B. White, W. Strahan, T. Payne, W. Owen, and W. Johnston [and 7 others], 1761 - Biography
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Page 490 - ... to lie Spenser's works; this I happened to fall upon, and was infinitely delighted with the stories of the knights and giants and monsters and brave houses which I found everywhere there...
Page 447 - For ye may all prophesy one by one, that all may learn, and all may be comforted.
Page 81 - O Pallas ! thou hast fail'd thy plighted word, To fight with caution, not to tempt the sword : I warn'd thee, but in vain ; for well I knew What perils youthful ardour would pursue ; That boiling blood would carry thee too far, Young as thou wert in dangers, raw to war ! O curst essay of arms, disastrous doom, Prelude of bloody fields and fights to come...
Page 174 - Porta could not have described their natures better than by the marks which the poet gives them. The matter and manner of their tales, and of their telling, are so suited to their different educations, humours, and callings that each of them would be improper in any other mouth.
Page 174 - We must be children before we grow men. There was an Ennius, and in process of time a Lucilius and a Lucretius, before Virgil and Horace; even after Chaucer there was a Spenser, a Harrington, a Fairfax, before Waller and Denham were in being; and our numbers were in their nonage till these last appeared.
Page 500 - I renounce and refuse, as things written with my hand, contrary to the truth which I thought in my heart, and written for fear of death, and to save my life, if it might be...
Page 412 - I do declare and promise, that I will be true and faithful to the Commonwealth of England, as it is now established, without a King or House of Lords.
Page 175 - Chaucer's side ; for though the Englishman has borrowed many tales from the Italian, yet it appears that those of Boccace were not generally of his own making, but taken from authors of former ages, and by him only modelled ; so that what there was of invention in either of them, may be judged equal.
Page 373 - I have pleaded guilty to all thoughts and expressions of mine which can be truly argued of obscenity, profaneness, or immorality, and retract them. If he be my enemy, let him triumph; if he be my friend, as I have given him no personal occasion to be otherwise, he will be glad of my repentance. It becomes me not to draw my pen in the defence of a bad cause when I have so often drawn it for a good one.
Page 490 - I found everywhere there (though my understanding had little to do with all this) ; and, by degrees, with the tinkling of the rhyme and dance of the numbers, so that I think I had read him all over before I was twelve years old, and was thus made a poet as immediately as a child is made an eunuch.

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