The Western Journal and Civilian: Devoted to Agriculture, Manufactures, Mechanic Arts, Internal Improvement, Commerce, Public Policy, and Polite Literature, Volume 11 (Google eBook)

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M. Tarver & H. Cobb, 1854 - United States
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Page 304 - The stars shall fade away, the sun himself Grow dim with age, and Nature sink in years, But thou shalt flourish in immortal youth, Unhurt amidst the war of elements, The wreck of matter, and the crush of worlds.
Page 305 - Let our object be, OUR COUNTRY, OUR WHOLE COUNTRY, AND NOTHING BUT OUR COUNTRY. And, by the blessing of God, may that country itself become a vast and splendid monument, not of oppression and terror, but of Wisdom, of Peace, and of Liberty, upon which the world may gaze with admiration forever...
Page 304 - Let us develop the resources of our land, call forth its powers, build up its institutions, promote all its great interests, and see whether we also, in our day and generation, may not perform something worthy to be remembered.
Page 312 - St Lawrence, and the carrying places between the same, shall be common highways and forever free, as well to the inhabitants of the said Territory as to the citizens of the United States and those of any other States that may be admitted into the Confederacy, without any tax, impost, or duty therefor.
Page 299 - Look not mournfully into the Past. It comes not back again. Wisely improve the Present. It is thine. Go forth to meet the shadowy Future, without fear, and with a manly heart.
Page 174 - ... may be, give such further donations and privileges to those already established as may be necessary to secure the objects of their institution; and it shall be the duty of the general assembly, at their next session, to provide effectual measures for the improvement and permanent security of the funds and endowments of such institutions.
Page 432 - Though he had decided opinions, he never took any strong interest in questions of controversial theology. His experience in life had taught him that good men were confined to no theological party, and it was his conviction that the fundamental principles of religion, in spite of minor differences, were received by all sects. His nature was not speculative but practical, and religion with him took a practical form. He thought little of the words and much of the substance. Better words to describe...
Page 174 - The Legislature shall encourage, by all suitable means the promotion of intellectual, scientific, moral and agricultural improvement. The proceeds of all lands that have been or hereafter may be granted by the United States to this State for the support of schools...
Page 432 - Sure the last end Of the good man is peace! How calm his exit! Night-dews fall not more gently to the ground, Nor weary worn-out winds expire so soft.
Page 334 - ... shall be punished by a fine of not less than five hundred nor more than one thousand dollars for each offense.

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