Byzantium's Balkan Frontier: A Political Study of the Northern Balkans, 900-1204

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Jun 29, 2000 - History - 352 pages
1 Review
Byzantium's Balkan Frontier is the first narrative history in English of the northern Balkans in the tenth to twelfth centuries. Where previous histories have been concerned principally with the medieval history of distinct and autonomous Balkan nations, this study regards Byzantine political authority as a unifying factor in the various lands which formed the empire's frontier in the north and west. It takes as its central concern Byzantine relations with all Slavic and non-Slavic peoples - including the Serbs, Croats, Bulgarians and Hungarians - in and beyond the Balkan Peninsula, and explores in detail imperial responses, first to the migrations of nomadic peoples, and subsequently to the expansion of Latin Christendom. It also examines the changing conception of the frontier in Byzantine thought and literature through the middle Byzantine period.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Like it very much
Thanks
s

Contents

Preface
vii
A note on citation and transliteration
ix
Abbreviations
xi
Introduction
14
the Northern Balkans c 900963
31
CHAPTER TWO The Byzantine occupation of Bulgaria 9631025
47
CHA PTER THREE Northern nomads 10251100
80
CHAPTER FOUR Southern Slavs 10251100
117
Hungarians and Venetians 11001143
187
CHAPTER SEVEN Manuel I Comnenus confronts the West 11431156
211
the annexation of Sirmium and Dalmatia 11561180
239
CHAPTER NINE Casting of the Byzantine Yoke 11801204
275
Conclusions
316
Bibliography
324
Index
345
Copyright

Normans and Crusaders 10811118
156

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2000)

Paul Stephenson is a professor of history at the University of Durham and a specialist in the early and middle Byzantine periods. His publications include The Legend of Basil the Bulgar-slayer (2003) and Byzantium's Balkan Frontier: A Political Study of the Northern Balkans, 900-1204 (2003). Stephenson has researched and taught in the UK, Ireland, Germany, and the United States.

Bibliographic information