The National Fourth Reader: Containing a Course of Instruction in Elocution, Exercises in Reading and Declamation, and Copious Notes : Giving the Pronunciation and Definitions of Words, Biographical Sketches of Persons Whose Names Occur in the Reading Lessons, and the Explanation of Classical and Historical Allusions (Google eBook)

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A.S. Barnes & Burr, 1859 - Readers (Elementary) - 408 pages
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Contents

Lad and his Neighbor
58
Peter of Cortona
61
Peter of Cortonaconcluded
63
Amusing Anecdote 06
66
On the Waste of Life Dr Franklin
70
Who was the Gentleman?
72
A Modern Cincinnatus
74
Conversation Sir Matthew Hale
76
The Deformed Child 0 Edwards
79
Anecdote of a Dog
84
A Human Being with Nothing to Do
86
The Author of Sweet Home
88
The Old Family Bible
90
Ornithology A Review
97
A Morning Conversation Miss Edgeworth
100
Archbishop Sharpe and the Kobber Percy Anecdotes
103
The Fisherman of Casco Bay Independent Statesman
105
Stuart the Painter
111
The Old Armchair EliiaCook
112
Lokman Aikin n3 40 Lazy People Caroline M Kvlland
114
The Worth of Hours R M Milne
117
The Sabbath in New England Miss C M Sedgwick
118
The Country Church T Buchanan Read
120
4 The Cynic Henry Ward Bcecher
124
Epitaph on a Candle Punch
125
46 Comparison of Watches Miss Edgeworth
126
True Freedom and How to Gain it Charles Mackay
128
The Cavern by the Sea Quarterly Review
130
The Hippopotamus
131
The Hippopotamuscontinued
134
The Hippopotamusconcluded
136
The Rothschilds Anon
140
Opposite Examples Horace Mann
141
Look Aloft Jonathan Lawrence
143
The Famine in Ireland George D Prentice
144
Love of Country and of Home Jama Montgomery
146
Anecdote of ChiefJustice Marshall
147
Woodman spare that Tree George P Morris
149
Terrific Scene at the Great Natural Bridge Va Elihu BurriU
152
The Sailors Song J W Procter
156
The Landsmans Song B W Procter
157
Golden Rules of David Copperfield Charles Dickens
158
GG The Story of Parnells Hermit Wartm
162
Cruelty to Animals William Couyer 100
164
Passage of the Potomac through the Blue Ridge Thos Jefferson
165
Perpetual Adoration Thomas Moore
166
Windows Henry Ward Beecher
167
Recreation Edward Everett
169
The Study of History Ruhnken
170
Seasons of Prayer Henry Ware Jr
176
Confessions of a Bashful Man Anon
179
Confessions of a Bashful Manconcluded
181
Contrasted Soliloquies Jane Taylor
183
Contrasted Soliloquiesconcluded
184
The Days that are Gone Charles Mackay
186
The Journey of a DayA Picture of Human Life Dr Johnson
188
Hiawathas Canoebuilding Henry W Longfellow
212
North American Indians Sprague
215
They are Passing Away R M Carlton
217
Rural Life in Sweden Henry W Longfellow
218
Life and Death From the German of Ruckert
221
Children R II Dana
224
The Votary of Pleasure Charles H Lyon
226
Judge not
227
Judge notconcluded
230
The Laborer William D Gallaher
233
The True Dignity of Labor William Houitt
234
Labor Osgood
237
Escape from a Panther J Fenimore Cooper
239
A Challenge to America Punch
245
War Robert Hall
247
Battle Fields or Vultures Shambles Dr Johnson
250
The Watcher on the Tower Charles Mackay
252
The Golden Age of New York Washington Irving
254
Lilias Grieve John WiUon
258
Lilias Grieveconcluded
262
The Hermit James Beattie
266
The KnightPart First
267
The HermitPart Second 2139
271
No life pleasing to God that is not useful to Man Ilawlcesworth
273
Address to the Deity Mrs Barbauld
278
The Universal Prayer Alexander Pope
281
An Interview with a Malay Thomas De Quincy
283
The Burdens of Mankind Joseph Addison
285
The Burdens of Mankindconcluded
288
The Old Clock on the Stairs Henry W Longfellow
291
The Morning Daniel Webster
293
Flowers Henry Ward Beecher
295
The Death of the Flowers William Cullen Bryant
297
The Sense of Beauty Wilfiam E dunning
298
The Arabs Farewell to his Steed Mrs Norton
300
The Vision of Carazan Hawkesworth
303
Friendship Mrs Norton
307
The Headstone John Wilson
309
The Brothers Charles Sprague
313
The Wife Washington Irving
316
The Family Meeting Charles Sprague
324
Address to the Moon Ossian
326
Arnold Winkelried James Montgomery
332
Feelings excited by a Long Voyage Washington Irving
333
Lines to a Child on his Voyage to France Christian Disciple
338
Crime its own Detecter Daniel Webster
340
The Greek Emigrants Song mcsG Pcrcival
342
From the Tragedy of King John Shakspeare
346
The History of Prince Arthur Charles Dickens
352
The White Stone Canoe II R Schoolcraft
358
Character of Henry Clay William H Seward
366
Sorrow for the Dead Washington Irving
374
Death of Little Nell Charles Dickens
380
A Sister Pleading for a Condemned Brother Sliakspeare
387
Discovery of America Edward Everett
393
The Decay of Nature and of Man Archibald Alison
399

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 350 - I saw a smith stand with his hammer, thus, The whilst his iron did on the anvil cool, With open mouth swallowing a tailor's news ; Who, with his shears and measure in his hand, Standing on slippers, (which his nimble haste Had falsely thrust upon contrary feet) Told of a many thousand warlike French, That were embattailed and rank'd in Kent.
Page 26 - Who is here so base that would be a bondman? If any, speak; for him have I offended. Who is here so rude that would not be a Roman?
Page 282 - If I am right, Thy grace impart, Still in the right to stay ; If I am wrong, oh, teach my heart To find that better way.
Page 342 - The secret which the murderer possesses soon comes to possess him, and like the evil spirits of which we read, it overcomes him and leads him whithersoever it will. He feels it beating at his heart, rising to his throat, and demanding di.sclosure. He thinks the whole world sees it in his face, reads it in his eyes, and almost hears its workings in the very silence of his thoughts.
Page 390 - That skins the vice o' the top. Go to your bosom ; Knock there, and ask your heart what it doth know That 's like my brother's fault : if it confess A natural guiltiness such as is his, Let it not sound a thought upon your tongue Against my brother's life.
Page 26 - O, now you weep, and I perceive you feel The dint of pity; these are gracious drops. Kind souls, what! weep you when you but behold Our Caesar's vesture wounded ? Look you here, Here is himself, marr'd as you see, with traitors.
Page 376 - If thou art a child, and hast ever added a sorrow to the soul, or a furrow to the silvered brow of an affectionate parent if thou art a husband, and hast ever caused the fond bosom that ventured its whole happiness in thy arms, to doubt one moment of thy kindness or thy truth...
Page 26 - Speak the speech, I pray you, as I pronounced it to you, trippingly on the tongue : but if you mouth it, as many of our players do, I had as lief the town-crier spoke my lines.
Page 36 - I hate him for he is a Christian; But more for that in low simplicity He lends out money gratis, and brings down The rate of usance here with us in Venice. If I can catch him once upon the hip, I will feed fat the ancient grudge I bear him.
Page 31 - A wise son maketh a glad father: but a foolish son is the heaviness of his mother.

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