A Stillness at Appomattox: The Army of the Potomac Trilogy

Front Cover
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Aug 1, 1990 - History - 448 pages
30 Reviews
When first published in 1953, Bruce Catton, our foremost Civil War historian was awarded both the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award for excellence in nonfiction.  This final volume of The Army of the Potomac trilogy relates the final year of the Civil War.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
15
4 stars
9
3 stars
5
2 stars
1
1 star
0

Review: A Stillness at Appomattox: The Army of the Potomac Trilogy (Army of the Potomac #3)

User Review  - Kevin - Goodreads

Bruce Catton is from my hometown: Petoskey, Michigan. There is a statue of him outside of the Petoskey Carnegie Library where I checked out books as a child. I have read his short memoir "Waiting for ... Read full review

Review: A Stillness at Appomattox: The Army of the Potomac Trilogy (Army of the Potomac #3)

User Review  - JJ Jinkins - Goodreads

A Stillness at Appomattox was a good read, but somewhat disappointing compared to Terrible Swift Sword. The book was tedious at some times, and towards the end I could not wait to complete it. The ... Read full review

Related books

Contents

FIVE
9
THKEE
131
FOUR
187
Copyright

4 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1990)

Bruce Catton, whose complete name was Charles Bruce Catton, was born in Petoskey, Michigan, in 1899. A United States journalist and writer, Catton was one of America's most popular Civil War historians. Catton worked as a newspaperman in Boston, Cleveland, and Washington, and also held a position at the U.S. Department of Commerce in 1948. Catton's best-selling book, A Stillness at Appomattox, a recount of the most spectacular conflicts between Generals Grant and Lee in the final year of the Civil War, earned him a Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award in 1954. Before his death in 1978, Catton wrote a total of ten books detailing the Civil War, including his last, Grant Takes Command.

Bibliographic information