Late Night Thoughts on Listening to Mahler's Ninth Symphony

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Random House Publishing Group, Sep 1, 1984
11 Reviews

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Review: Late Night Thoughts on Listening to Mahler's Ninth Symphony

User Review  - Shih-ni - Goodreads

"Late Night Thoughts on Listening to Mahler's Ninth Symphony" is the title and the last chapter of the book, which contains 24 short, non-fiction essays. Lewis Thomas, a scientist and a medical doctor ... Read full review

Review: Late Night Thoughts on Listening to Mahler's Ninth Symphony

User Review  - Steve Nay - Goodreads

This is an insightful series of essays ranging from the deadly serious opener, "The Unforgettable Fire", to the tongue-in-cheek "On Smell", to the exhortative "The Problem of Dementia". Thomas ... Read full review

Contents

The Unforgettable Fire
1
Making Science Work
18
Clever Animals
35
Copyright

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About the author (1984)

Lewis Thomas was born in Flushing, New York, and received his medical degree from Harvard University, with a specialization in internal medicine and pathology. He has been a professor at several medical schools, as well as dean of the Yale Medical School. Most recently Thomas has been chancellor and president emeritus of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City and professor of medicine at the Cornell Medical School. His erudite books have earned him a wide audience, making him one of the best-known advocates of science in the United States during the past 20 years. For example, The Lives of a Cell won the National Book Award in arts and letters in 1974, and The Medusa and the Snail won the American Book Award for science in 1981.

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