THE WORLD OF THOUGHT IN ANCIENT CHINA

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Harvard University Press, 1985 - History - 490 pages
3 Reviews

The center of this prodigious work of scholarship is a fresh examination of the range of Chinese culture thought during the formative period of Chinese culture. Benjamin Schwartz looks at the surviving texts of this period with a particular focus on the range of diversity to be found in them. While emphasizing the problematic and complex nature of this thought he also considers views which stress the unity of Chinese culture.

Attention is accorded to pre-Confucian texts, to the evolution of early Confucianism, to Mo-Tzu, to the "Taoists" the legalists, the Ying-Yang school, the "five classics" as well as to intellectual issues which cut across the conventional classification of schools. The main focus is on the high cultural texts, but Mr. Schwartz also explores the question of the relationship of these texts to the vast realm of popular culture.

  

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User Review  - Bendick Ong - Goodreads

A must-read for any serious scholar of ancient Chinese thought! Read full review

Contents

Introduction
Early Cultural Orientations Issues and Speculations
14
Early Chou Thought Continuity and Breakthrough
38
Confucius The Vision of the Analects
54
Motzus Challenge
133
The Emergence of a Common Discourse Some Key Terms
171
The Ways of Taoism
184
The Defense of the Confucian Discourse Mencius and Hsüntzu
253
Correlative Cosmology The School of Yin and Yang
348
The Five Classics
381
Postscript
405
Notes
421
Selected Bibliography
459
Glossary
467
Index
471
Copyright

Legalism The Behavioral Science
319

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About the author (1985)

Benjamin I. Schwartz was Leroy B. Williams Professor of History and Political Science, Emeritus, at Harvard University.

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