Así que pasen cinco años: leyenda del tiempo

Front Cover
Cátedra, 1995 - Drama - 361 pages
2 Reviews
Destaca en esta obra la contemplacion erotico-filosofica del destino humano expresada en el eterno juego del tiempo, el amor y la muerte. En su peculiar calidad de poema dramatizado consigue la mas completa simbiosis de los conceptos de poesia y teatro.

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Review: Así que pasen cinco años

User Review  - John - Goodreads

Not an easy work to interpret, but so beautiful it hardly matters. I should issue some kind of warning about exactly how avant-garde the work is, with the dead bodies of a ghost and a child appearing ... Read full review

Review: Así que pasen cinco años

User Review  - Anna - Goodreads

This play always puzzles me, despite the regularity of its themes--love and death. Love and death are always present in Lorca's theater. But in this case love and death mix with time (and the timeless ... Read full review

About the author (1995)

Garcia Lorca is perhaps the best known of modern Spanish writers, partly because of his brutal execution outside Granada by Franco's army at the beginning of the civil war, but primarily because of his genius for poetry and drama. In 1928 Lorca published Gypsy Ballads, which won him immediate success and is considered one of the most important volumes of poetry of the century. Attracted to the gypsies for their exotic folklore, sexual vitality, and their status as a group on the fringe of Spanish society, Lorca enlarged the gypsy people and their traditions to mythical proportions. Nature takes on human form while reality acquires a dreamlike quality in this powerful transformation of the world into a myth. The verse is colorful, rhythmic, dramatic, symbolic, and suggestive. Lorca visited New York in 1929, experiencing a deep despair about a mechanical and dehumanized society; he saw in blacks the only hope for revitalization of that world. The volume Poet in New York (1929) shows the influence of Negro spirituals and the poets Walt Whitman and T. S. Eliot. Although Garcia Lorca was interested in drama throughout his life, he did not produce much of significance until the 1930s. Most important is his trilogy of Spanish rural life, Blood Wedding (1933), Yerma (1934), and The House of Bernarda Alba (1936), all tragedies with women as protagonists. In each play, the fall of the heroine, and of those around her whom she pulls down, is caused by frustrations produced by society. Blood Wedding demonstrates the sterility of the traditional code of honor. Yerma reveals the emptiness of a traditional marriage in which the woman must bear her husband children to prove her fidelity, and The House of Bernarda Alba dramatizes the destructive nature of Bernarda's dictatorial rule over her house, a microcosm of Spain. The Butterfly's Evil Spell (1919) is Lorca's first play; The Shoemaker's Prodigious Wife (1931) and Don Perlimplin (1931) are farces; The Billy-Club Puppets (1931) is a puppet play.

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