The life and correspondence of Francis Bacon [by J. F. Foard]. (Google eBook)

Front Cover
1861
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Contents

Hit first begging letter to her Lord
40
His appearance in parliament against Mary Queen of Scots
47
Francis Bacons brother Anthony
53
His messenger to propitiate her
59
Robert Devereux second Earl of Essex
67
Bacon in debt and danger
73
Its offence to Majesty 79
79
The Essex tie of affinity
85
More a father than a friend to him in Anthonys words
91
Bacon traduces his rival
97
The aptitude of a great reviewer in creating facta
102
Character of the hero impossible
108
Of the Essex plot
114
CHAPTER VII
120
Sir Christopher Blount and Lady Leicester
126
His censors wisdom and his truth as shown in the narration
132
Tho value of tho impeachment
138
Wholesale slander of Lettice Knollys
140
A modern critics superiority in moderation temper and purity
146
The Queen displeased with Essexs advocacy
152
Sir Robert the hunchback
158
The prospect of place brightens
164
Bacon offends the Lord Keeper Sir Thomas Egerton
170
The causesThe Queens prejudicesHis own selfishness
176
The entertainment at Essex HouseBacon writes speeches
177
Bacons letter in reply
183
The quarrel of Essex and Raleigh
189
Writes advice to Essex whose favour is waning at Court
195
Arrested for debt 201
201
His coconspirators
207
The interview of the judges with the conspirators
213
The blockade of Essex House
219
Walter Devereuxs bequest to Elizabeth
225
The splendour of the age
231
Robert Devereuxs behaviour
241
Sir Francis Racons oratory
248
Bacons further pleading against his friend and patron
255
The wife and mother of the prisoner
261
His anonymous letter to the Countess of Northumberland
267
The influence of Robert Cecil on Essexs fall
269
CHAPTER XVI
326
The Commons affrighted at the Kings claims
332
Mr Dixons New History of the subject
338
Writes to the Bishop of Bath and Wells to procure evidence
344
Owens case ___
350
The nature of Peachams offence
352
The English law of Torture and Appendix p 557
358
Oliver St Johns opposition to these exactions
364
Evil advice to the King
370
The Kings prerogative
378
As exemplified in his Essays
384
Weldon on James and Somersets guilt
390
When the case occurs to decide twixt the King and justice
396
Isrd Bacons letter to hit rival after hit disgrace
402
Villiers and Bacons mutual services
408
The seeds of danger
414
First complaints against Bacon as judge
420
Correspondence concerning the projected marriage
426
Buckinghams rebuke
435
Villiers made wise by Bacons ingratitude to Essex and Somerset
443
Villiers direction of affairs in Chancery
449
Execution and dentil of Raleigh 44
455
Accumulating disorders 458459 46t
461
Tho flight of Monpesson
467
Buckingham abandons his minion
475
Adjournment of the House
482
Attempts to conciliate his judges
488
Villiers overreached by his servant _ _ _ _
494
CHAPTER XXII
497
Translation of The Advancement of Learning into Latin
503
Bacon greater than Napoleon after his fallThe philosopher
509
Elizabeth a great monarch _
516
The philosopy of nature
522
His testimony against popery
528
Poetry the first art to awake
533
The ventures of Essex Cumberland and Howard
539
Tho influence of Catholicism
545
APPENDIX
551
Note on Torture
557
Note on the Story of the Ring 56fi
566

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 385 - MEN in great place are thrice servants ; servants of the sovereign or state, servants of fame, and servants of business ; so as they have no freedom, neither in their persons, nor in their actions, nor in their times. It is a strange desire to seek power and to lose liberty ; or to seek power over others, and to lose power over a man's self.
Page 198 - If to do were as easy as to know what were^ good to do, chapels had been churches, and poor men's cottages princes' palaces. It is a good divine that follows his own instructions: I can easier teach twenty what were good to be done, than be one of the twenty to follow mine own teaching.
Page 50 - I have taken all knowledge to be my province ; and if I could purge it of two sorts of rovers, whereof the one with frivolous disputations, confutations, and verbosities, the other with blind experiments and auricular traditions and impostures, hath committed so many spoils, I hope I should bring in industrious observations, grounded conclusions, and profitable inventions and discoveries ; the best state of that province. This, whether it be curiosity, or vain glory, or nature, or (if one take it...
Page 385 - Love thyself last : cherish those hearts that hate thee ; Corruption wins not more than honesty. Still in thy right hand carry gentle peace, To silence envious tongues. Be just, and fear not : Let all the ends, thou aim'st at, be thy country's, Thy God's, and truth's ; th(?n if thou fall'st, O Cromwell, Thou fall'st a blessed martyr.
Page 51 - ... voluntary poverty: but this I will do; I will sell the inheritance that I have, and purchase some lease of quick revenue, or some office of gain that shall be executed by deputy, and so give over all care of service, and become some sorry book-maker, or a true pioneer in that mine of truth, which (he said) lay so deep.
Page iii - O eloquent, just, and mighty Death ! whom none could advise, thou hast persuaded ; what none hath dared, thou hast done ; and whom all the world hath flattered, thou only hast cast out of the world and despised ; thou hast drawn together all the far-stretched greatness, all the pride, cruelty, and ambition of man, and covered it all over with these two narrow words, Hie jaeet ! Lastly, whereas this book, by the title it hath, calls itself The First Part of tlie General History of the World...
Page 50 - I will not do as Anaxagoras did, who reduced himself with contemplation unto voluntary poverty: but this I will do, I will sell the inheritance that I have, and purchase some lease of quick revenue, or some office of gain, that shall be executed by deputy, and so give over all care of service, and become some sorry bookmaker, or a true pioneer in that mine of truth...
Page 479 - It is no feigning or fainting, but sickness both of my heart and of my back, though joined with that comfort of mind that persuadeth me that I am not far from Heaven, whereof I feel the first fruits.
Page 195 - A man of a nature not to be ruled, that hath the advantage of my affection and knoweth it, of an estate not grounded to his greatness, of a popular reputation, of a military dependence...
Page 530 - Here therefore [is] the first distemper of learning, when men study words and not matter : whereof though I have represented an example of late times, yet it hath been and will be secundum majus et minus in all time.

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