The Scots Magazine and Edinburgh Literary Miscellany, Volume 72 (Google eBook)

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Archibald Constable, 1810 - English literature
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Page 363 - On his bold visage middle age Had slightly pressed its signet sage, Yet had not quenched the open truth And fiery vehemence of youth ; Forward and frolic glee was there, The will to do, the soul to dare, The sparkling glance, soon blown to fire, Of hasty love or headlong ire.
Page 364 - Then each at once his falchion drew. Each on the ground his scabbard threw, Each looked to sun and stream and plain As what they ne'er might see again ; Then foot and point and eye opposed, In dubious strife they darkly closed.
Page 363 - And never brooch the folds combined Above a heart more good and kind. Her kindness and her worth to spy, You need but gaze on Ellen's eye; Not Katrine, in her mirror blue, Gives back the shaggy banks more true...
Page 364 - And locked his arms his foeman round. Now, gallant Saxon, hold thine own ! No maiden's hand is round thee thrown ! That desperate grasp thy frame might feel, Through bars of brass and triple steel! They tug, they strain ! down, down they go, The Gael above, Fitz-James below.
Page 363 - And seldom was a snood amid Such wild luxuriant ringlets hid, Whose glossy black to shame might bring The plumage of the raven's wing; And seldom o'er a breast so fair Mantled a plaid with modest care; And never brooch the folds combined Above a heart more good and kind. Her kindness and her worth to spy, You need but gaze on Ellen's eye...
Page 60 - Providence to efface the evils of a terrible revolution, and to reestablish the altar, the throne, and social order. But the dissolution of my marriage will, in no.
Page 671 - Association made him an offer of their chair, by a unanimous resolution communicated to him, unsought and unexpected, in a public letter signed by the secretary in the name of the whole body ; and from that day to the day he was committed to the Tower, I will lead him by the hand in your view, that you may see there is no blame in him.
Page 673 - Government should be disposed to cram it down their throats by force, yet such a violence to the united sentiments of a whole people appeared to be a measure so obnoxious, so dangerous, and withal so unreasonable, that it was wisely and judiciously dropped, to satisfy the general wishes of the nation, and not to avert the vengeance of those low incendiaries, whose misdeeds have rather been 'talked of than proved. Thus, gentlemen, the exculpation of Lord George's conduct, on the 29th of May, is sufficiently...
Page 18 - ... country, and for the benefit of Europe in general, a great and glorious victory, and may no misconduct in any one tarnish it; and may humanity after victory be the predominant feature in the British fleet! For myself individually, I commit my life to Him that made me; and may His blessing alight on my endeavours for serving my country faithfully!
Page 669 - ... within the statute ; as it has never been asserted by the wildest adventurer in constructive treason that a multitude, armed with nothing, threatening nothing, and doing nothing, was an army levying war, I am entitled to say that the evidence does not support the first charge in the indictment, but that, on the contrary, it is manifestly false, false in the knowledge of the crown, which prosecutes it ; false in the knowledge of every man in London who was not bedridden on Friday, the...

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