Black Orchid

Front Cover
DC Comics, 1991 - Fiction - 152 pages
16 Reviews
By the acclaimed writer of THE SANDMAN LIBRARY. Consider the orchid: exotic, intoxicating and rare. Consider Black Orchid: a demigoddess in search of her own identity. The flowerlike result of a scientific experiment, the Black Orchid must reconcile her human memories with her botanical origins. Graphic novel format. Mature readers.

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Hmf, no thumbnail. This was a reread (Matt gave it to me for my birthday and we already own it in a different edition). Dave McKean's artwork is incredible as ever and Gaiman's compressed, dreamy-intense, allusive story-telling renders this a gorgeous stand-alone graphic novel. Beautifully interwoven with familiar characters from the DC universe (Lex Luthor, Batman, Swamp Thing, Poison Ivy, plus some minor denizens of Arkham Asylum). The conclusion is um erm okay not that great (a poster over at The Comic Treadmill* reported, "I had people coming into the shop for years looking for issue #4 of this series, apparently not believing that was actually the real ending.") but it's a worthwhile read nonetheless.
*http://www.comictreadmill.com/CTMBlogarchives/2005/2005_Individual/2005_04/000759.php
and when are we going to be able to embed links in these reviews for pete's sake?!
 

Review: Black Orchid (Black Orchid Prestige)

User Review  - Nick - Goodreads

There's one great moment in Black Orchid, and it appears right off the bat. (It's also spoiled in the introduction, which I recommend you skip for this exact reason). Unfortunately, once this great ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
14
Section 2
27
Section 3
36

6 other sections not shown

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About the author (1991)

Neil Richard MacKinnon Gaiman was born in Portchester, England on November 10, 1960. Gaiman worked as a journalist and freelance writer for a time, before deciding to try his hand at comic books. Some of his work has appeared in publications such as Time Out, The Sunday Times, Punch and The Observer. His first comic endeavor was the graphic novel series The Sandman. It is the comic book he is most famous for and the series has won every major industry award, including nine Will Eisner Comic Industry Awards, three Harvey Awards, and the 1991 World Fantasy Award for best short story, making it the first comic ever to win a literary award. Gaiman writes both children and adult books. His most recent adult title, The Ocean at the End of the Lane, has won numerous awards, most notably: the British National Book Awards, Book of the Year for 2013, and the Locus Award for Best Fantasy Novel for 2014 . His other adult books include: Stardust, which won the Mythopoeic Award as best novel for adults in 1999; American Gods, which won the Hugo, Nebula, Bram Stoker, SFX, and Locus awards; and Anansi Boys. His children's books include The Day I Swapped My Dad for Two Goldfish; Coraline, which won the Elizabeth Burr/Worzalla, the BSFA, the Hugo, the Nebula, and the Bram Stoker awards; The Wolves in the Walls; and The Graveyard Book, which won the Newbery Award in 2009. He also co-wrote Good Omens with Terry Pratchett.

Dave McKean was born on December 29, 1963 in Maidenhead, England. He is an illustrator, photographer, comic book artist, filmmaker and musician. McKean is best known for his regular collaboration with Neil Gaiman. MirrorMask, McKean's first feature film as director and visual designer, premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in January 2005. The screenplay was written by Neil Gaiman.

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