Hawaiian Legends of Volcanoes: (mythology) Collected and Translated from the Hawaiian (Google eBook)

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William Drake Westervelt
Ellis Press, 1916 - Nature - 205 pages
2 Reviews
Interspersed with legends of the fire goddess Pele, the lightning goddess Hiiaka, and others, are nuggets of related geological and historical information. First published in 1916, this book has a four-page appendix and notes on Polynesian language.
  

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Review: Hawaiian Legends of Volcanoes

User Review  - Mia McInnis - Goodreads

Read this for research. Not too bad. Read full review

Review: Hawaiian Legends of Volcanoes

User Review  - Melicent - Goodreads

i bought this on my trip to hawaii, and it was an awesome light read for the plane rides Read full review

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Page 143 - ... leave. So much like life they looked that they at first supposed them merely at rest, and it was not until they had come up to them and handled them that they could detect their mistake.
Page 191 - ... reigns past it had kept below the level of the surrounding plain, continually extending its surface and increasing its depth, and occasionally throwing up, with violent explosions, huge rocks, or red-hot stones.
Page 142 - ... began to shake and rock beneath their feet, and it became quite impossible to stand. Soon a dense cloud of darkness was seen to rise out of the crater, and, almost at the same instant, the thunder began to roar in the heavens, and the lightning to flash. It continued to ascend and spread around until the whole region was enveloped, and the light of day was entirely excluded.
Page 143 - Some few persons of the forward company were burned to death by the sand and cinders, and others were seriously injured. All experienced a suffocating sensation upon the lungs, and hastened on with all possible speed. " The rear body, which was nearest the volcano at the time of the eruption, seemed to suffer the least injury, and after the earthquake and shower of sand had passed over, hastened forward to escape the dangers which threatened them, and rejoicing in mutual congratulations that they...
Page 144 - ' A blast of sulphurous gas, a shower of heated embers, or a volume of heated steam would sufficiently account for this sudden death. Some of the narrators, who saw the corpses, affirm that though in no place deeply burnt, yet they were thoroughly scorched.
Page 147 - Tamehameha went, attended by a large retinue of chiefs and priests, and, as the most valuable offering he could make, cut off part of his own hair, which was always considered sacred, and threw it into the torrent.
Page 142 - ... the thunder began to roar in the heavens and the lightning to flash. It continued to ascend and spread abroad until the whole region was enveloped, and the light of day was entirely excluded. The darkness was the more terrific, being made visible by an awful glare from streams of red and blue light variously combined, that issued from the pit below, and lit up at intervals by the intense flashes of lightning from above.
Page 209 - A few words should be added on the peculiar genius and structure of the Polynesian language in general and of the Hawaiian dialect in particular. It is the law of all Polynesian languages that every word and syllable must end in a vowel, so that no two consonants are ever heard without a vowel sound between them. Most of the radical words are dissyllables, and the accent is generally on the penult. The Polynesian ear is as nice in marking the slightest variations in vowel sound as it is dull in distinguishing...
Page 191 - ... huge rocks or red-hot stones. These eruptions, they said, were always accompanied by dreadful earthquakes, loud claps of thunder, with vivid and quicksucceeding lightning. No great explosion, they added, had taken place since the days of Keoua...
Page 143 - A few of the forward company were burned to death by the sand, and all of them experienced a suffocating sensation. The rear company, which was nearest the volcano at the time, suffered little injury, and after the earthquake and shower of sand had passed over, hastened on, to greet their comrades ahead, on their escape from so imminent...

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