Some Merchants and Sea Captains of Old Boston: Being a Collection of Sketches of Notable Men and Mercantile Houses Prominent During the Early Half of the Nineteenth Century in the Commerce and Shipping of Boston (Google eBook)

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State Street Trust Company, 1918 - Shipping - 53 pages
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Page 2 - On the river, boats are mysteriously abundant; everywhere they congregate in vast numbers; like a stream they advance and retire unceasingly. Thus the chances of contact are many, so are accidents, even to the breaking of one another's boats, to the injury of men's bodies, while more serious consequences might ensue.
Page 53 - chanty" in the morn, When we broke away the anchor to sail home around the Horn ! Oh, to see the white sails pulling, feel the lift beneath the keel, With the trade-wind's push behind her and the roll that made her reel ! The old Clipper days are over and the white-winged fleets no more, With their snowy sails unfolded, fly along the ocean floor...
Page 20 - They did not know but he remain'd fast ty'd. Two of said Indians were plundering, Down the Forecastle while he did this thing, The other two so watchful and so shy, And on him kept a constant Indian eye, That he stands still waiting till he could find; A time when they did him not so much mind; But when for plunder they to searching goes Then his contrivance presently he shows: He to his Brother Jacob runs with speed, And cuts his line: now both of them are freed. The Indians now alarmed, hereby,...
Page vii - The old Clipper days were jolly, when we sailed the Seven Seas, And the house-flags of our merchant ships were whipped by every breeze; It was good-by to your mother and the pretty girls on shore, For we're off around the howling Horn, bound down to Singapore.
Page 20 - At length sinks down and there was forced to stay. Two of the other rogues with much ado, Got out of water into a canoe, Which to the Vessel side was fastened, Themselves awhile in it they sheltered. Said Indians on board had left a gun, Unto the same said Jacob Tilton run, Catching it up to shoot them it mist fire, Which disappointed him of his desire. He catching up a stout great setting Pole, With all his might he struck them on the Jole, Giving them many blows upon the head, Over they turns,...
Page 33 - Always go straight forward, and if you meet the devil cut him in two, and go between the pieces; if any one imposes on you, tell him to whistle against a northwester and to bottle up moonshine.
Page 19 - Down at an eastward harbour call'd Fox Bay, They in a Schooner at an anchor lay. It was upon the fourteenth day 'of June, Six stout great Indians in the afternoon In two Canoes on board said Schooner came, With painted Faces in a churlish frame...
Page 21 - Nigh twenty-four hours if not more, They were a-coming from the former shore: Here they among the English find relief, Who dress their wounds which ease them of their grief, Their course for Ipswich town they next contrive, Where in few days their Vessel did arrive: Through so much danger, misery and pain, They are returned to their friends again. Thus I have summed up this tragick scene, As from their mouths it told to me has been...
Page 20 - And tho' they had from these blood-thirsty hounds Received many dismal stabs and wounds, While in their skirmish blood was up and hot, No more than Flea bites them they minded not, Said Daniel still retain'd his splitting knife, Who nimbly ply'd the same and fit for life; With one hand fended off the Indian blows, And with the other cross the face and nose Of Captain Sam, until his pagan head, Was chop'd and gash'd, and so much mangled; Bits of his Indian scalp hung down in strings, And blood...
Page 20 - ... hounds Received many dismal stabs and wounds, While in their skirmish blood was up and hot, No more than Flea bites them they minded not, Said Daniel still retain'd his splitting knife, Who nimbly ply'd the same and fit for life; With one hand fended off the Indian blows, And with the other cross the face and nose Of Captain Sam, until his pagan head, Was chop'd and gash'd, and so much mangled; Bits of his Indian scalp hung down in strings, And blood run pouring thence as out of springs.

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