Criminal justice: a brief introduction

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Prentice Hall, 2002 - Law - 460 pages
2 Reviews
"Criminal Justice: A Brief Introduction" uses real-life stories throughout that are designed to capture and sustain the attention of its readers, helping them achieve a meaningful and comprehensive understanding of its concepts. It explores how the criminal justice system balances individual rights (freedom) with the need for public order (safety). It explores the new environment of the ongoing threat of domestic terrorism; with its updated research and statistics, this edition is "the" most timely and relevant resource available. Real-life examples of current issues and topics in the criminal justice system round out comprehensive coverage of criminology, multiculturalism, crime reporting, criminal law, policing, adjudication and the court system, and the corrections system. With its comprehensive appendices and online resource guide, this book is an excellent reference for those involved in the criminal justice system.

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Review: Criminal Justice: A Brief Introduction (8th Edition)

User Review  - Damon Thueson - Goodreads

I am reading this for my Criminal Justice Class...so far it is pretty good reading...but he has stats from 2003 and I know there are more recent stats...so he is going to update the book again...and ask for more money...I don't dig that at all. Good material...bad ethics by the author. Read full review

Review: Criminal Justice: A Brief Introduction

User Review  - India - Goodreads

for school Read full review

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Contents

Crime in America
1
The System
13
Due Process and Individual Rights
21
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Frank Schmalleger, Ph.D.," is Professor Emeritus at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke, where he chaired the Department of Sociology, Social Work, and Criminal Justice for nearly 20 years. He currently serves as director of the Justice Research Association, a private consulting firm and think tank focusing on issues of crime and justice. Dr. Schmalleger is also founder and codirector of the Criminal Justice Distance Learning Consortium (http: //cjcentral.com/cjdlc).

Dr. Schmalleger holds degrees from the University of Notre Dame and Ohio State University, having earned both a master's degree (1970) and a doctorate in sociology (1974) from Ohio State University with a special emphasis in criminology. He served as an adjunct professor at Webster University in St. Louis, Missouri, where he helped develop the university's graduate program in Security Administration and Loss Prevention. He taught courses in that curriculum for more than a decade. Schmalleger also taught in the New School for Social Research's online graduate program, helping build the world's first electronic classrooms in support of distance learning through computer telecommunications. An avid Web developer, Schmalleger is the creator of a number of award-winning websites, including some that support this textbook (http: //www.prenhall.com/schmalleger; http: //cjtoday.com, and http: //cybrary.info).

Frank Schmalleger is the author of numerous articles and many books, including the widely used "Criminology Today" (Prentice Hall, 2002); "Criminal Justice: A Brief Introduction" (Prentice Hall, 2002); "Criminal Law Today" (Prentice Hall, 2002); "The Definitive Guide to Criminal Justice and Criminologyon the World Wide Web" (Prentice Hall, 2002); "Corrections in the Twenty first Century" (Glencoe, 2001), coauthored with John Smykla; "Crime and the Justice System in America: An Encyclopedia" (Greenwood, 1997); and "Trial of the Century: People of the State of California vs. Orenthal James Simpson" (Prentice Hall, 1996).

Schmalleger is the founding editor of the journal "The Justice Professional." He has served as editor for the Prentice Hall series "Criminal Justice in the Twenty-First Century" and as imprint adviser for Greenwood Publishing Group's criminal justice reference series.

Schmalleger's philosophy of both teaching and writing can be summed up in these words: "To communicate knowledge we must first catch, then hold, a person's interest--be it student, colleague, or policymaker. Our writing, our speaking, and our teaching must be relevant to the problems facing people today, and they must--in some way--help solve those problems.

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