The Anabasis, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Harper, 1839 - Iran
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Contents

I
41
II
83
III
112
IV
141
V
179
VI
215
VII
245

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Page 61 - Arabia, he states that the ostrich is frequently seen there ; that " none could take them, the horsemen who pursues them soon giving it over ; for they escaped far away, making use both of their feet to run, and of their wings, when expanded, as a sail to waft them along.
Page 171 - Faulchon, like those of the Lacedaemonians, with which they cut the Throats of those they over-powered, and afterwards, cutting off their Heads, carried them away in Triumph. It was their Custom to sing and dance, whenever they thought the Enemy saw them. They had Pikes fifteen Cubits in length, with only one Point. They staid in their Cities 'till the Greeks marched past them, and then followed harassing them perpetually. After that they retired to their...
Page 99 - Clearchus hearing this, asked the messenger of what extent the country was that lay between the Tigris and the canal : he answering it was of a large extent, and contained besides villages, many large cities, they concluded that the barbarians had sent this man insidiously, from an apprehension lest the Greeks should not pass the bridge, but remain in the island, which was defended on one side by the Tigris, and on the other by the canal ; where the country that lay between being large and fruitful,...
Page 131 - Parasangas in Circuit ; all built with Bricks, except the Plinth which was of Stone, and twenty Feet high. This City when besieged by the King of Persia, at the Time the Persians were wresting the Empire from the Medes, he could not make himself Master of it by any means; when it happened that the Sun, obscured by a Cloud, disappeared, and the Darkness continued 'till, the Inhabitants being seized with Consternation, the Town was taken.
Page 172 - Order it is not known, bringing together a great many Stones, made a large Mount, upon which they placed a great Quantity of Shields made of raw Ox-hides, Staves, and Bucklers taken from the Enemy. The Guide himself cut the Bucklers in Pieces, and exhorted the rest to do the same. After this the Greeks sent back their Guide, giving him Presents out of the public Stock, these were a Horse, a silver Cup, a Persian Dress, and ten Daricks. But, above all Things the Guide desired the Soldiers to give...
Page 60 - The country was a plain throughout, as even as the sea, and full of wormwood; and if any other kind of shrubs or reeds grew there, they had all an aromatic smell, but no trees could be seen. Bustards and ostriches, antelopes and wild asses, appeared to be the only inhabitants of the desert; and the fatigues of the march were alleviated by the amusements of the chase.
Page 73 - Greeks sung the paean, and began to advance against the enemy; but the motion occasioning a small fluctuation in the line of battle, those who were left behind hastened their march, and at once gave a general shout, as their custom is when they invoke the god of war, and all ran forward, striking their shields with their pikes, as some say, to frighten the enemy's horses ; so that before the...
Page 74 - The king, therefore, being at that time in the centre of his own battle, was, however, beyond the left wing of Cyrus; and when he saw none opposed him in front, nor any motion made to charge the troops that were drawn up before him, he wheeled to the left in order to surround their army...
Page 146 - Xenophon marched at the Head of the Rear-Guard towards the Passage before them, in order to draw the Attention of the Enemy that Way, and conceal, as much as possible, the March of the Detachment. When Xenophon, with the Rear-Guard, came to a Valley which they...
Page 163 - There was also wheat, barley, and legumens, and beer in jars, in which the malt itself floated even with the brims of the vessels, and with it reeds, some large and others small, without joints. These, when any one was dry, he was to take into his mouth and suck. The liquor was very strong, when unmixed with water, and exceeding pleasant to those who were used to it.

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