THE PROCESS OF EDUCATION

Front Cover
Harvard University Press, 1977 - Education - 97 pages
11 Reviews

In this classic argument for curriculum reform in early education, Jerome Bruner shows that the basic concepts of science and the humanities can be grasped intuitively at a very early age. He argues persuasively that curricula should he designed to foster such early intuitions and then build on them in increasingly formal and abstract ways as education progresses.

Bruner's foundational case for the spiral curriculum has influenced a generation of educators and will continue to be a source of insight into the goals and methods of the educational process.

  

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Review: The Process of Education

User Review  - Ilib4kids - Goodreads

(k:Bruner) 370.11 BRU Back Cover review: ...Jerome Bruner shows that the basic concepts of science and humanities can be grasped intuitively at a very early age.... should be designed to foster such ... Read full review

Review: The Process of Education

User Review  - Leanna Aker - Goodreads

Timeless educational classic. Bruner discusses the role of structure in learning (schema and the like), readiness for learning, intuition, and the desire to learn. His insights resonate with most educators, and they are simple and relevant, even today (book was written in the early 60's) Read full review

Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
THE IMPORTANCE OF STRUCTURE
17
READINESS FOR LEARNING
33
INTUITIVE AND ANALYTIC THINKING
55
MOTIVES FOR LEARNING
69
AIDS TO TEACHING
81
INDEX
95
Copyright

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About the author (1977)

Jerome Bruner has written many seminal works on education and cognitive studies, including "The Culture of Education" (1996), "Acts of Meaning" (1990), "On Knowing: Essays for the Left Hand" (1962), and "The Process of Education" (1961). Through his distinguished career, first as professor of psychology at Harvard and then as Watts Professor at Oxford, he has been at the forefront of what became, in the 1960s, the much-heralded Cognitive Revolution that forever changed the way psychologists study the mind. During the Kennedy and Johnson administrations, he served on the president's Science and Advisory Committee, and he has since helped to found Head Start. Currently, he lives in his native New York City with his wife, Carol Fleisher Feldman, and teaches at NYU Law School.

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