That Hideous Strength

Front Cover
Simon and Schuster, Oct 1, 1996 - Fiction - 384 pages
40 Reviews
Written during the dark hours immediately before and during the Second World War, C. S. Lewis's Space Trilogy, of which That Hideous Strength is the third volume, stands alongside such works as Albert Camus's The Plague and George Orwell's 1984 as a timely parable that has become timeless, beloved by succeeding generations as much for the sheer wonder of its storytelling as for the significance of its moral concerns. For the trilogy's central figure, C. S. Lewis created perhaps the most memorable character of his career, the brilliant, clear-eyed, and fiercely brave philologist Dr. Elwin Ransom. Appropriately, Lewis modeled Dr. Ransom on his dear friend J. R. R. Tolkien, for in the scope of its imaginative achievement and the totality of its vision of not one but two imaginary worlds, the Space Trilogy is rivaled in this century only by Tolkien's trilogy The Lord of the Rings. Readers who fall in love with Lewis's fantasy series The Chronicles of Narnia as children unfailingly cherish his Space Trilogy as adults; it, too, brings to life strange and magical realms in which epic battles are fought between the forces of light and those of darkness. But in the many layers of its allegory, and the sophistication and piercing brilliance of its insights into the human condition, it occupies a place among the English language's most extraordinary works for any age, and for all time.
In That Hideous Strength, the final installment of the Space Trilogy, the dark forces that have been repulsed in Out of the Silent Planet and Perelandra are massed for an assault on the planet Earth itself. Word is on the wind that the mighty wizard Merlin has come back to the land of the living after many centuries, holding the key to ultimate power for the force that can find him and bend him to its will. A sinister technocratic organization that is gaining force throughout England, N.I.C.E. (the National Institute of Coordinated Experiments), secretly controlled by humanity's mortal enemies, plans to use Merlin in their plot to "recondition" society. Dr. Ransom forms a countervailing group, Logres, in opposition, and the two groups struggle to a climactic resolution that brings the Space Trilogy to a magnificent, crashing close.
  

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Review: That Hideous Strength (Space Trilogy #3)

User Review  - Stephen - Goodreads

Mark Studdock is a newly married sociologist who has been given the opportunity of a lifetime; the chance to work with a promising and ambitious new research institute setting up shop in his sleepy ... Read full review

Review: That Hideous Strength (Space Trilogy #3)

User Review  - ladydusk - Goodreads

I read this on Kindle. I really enjoyed this book. There was so much that Lewis had to say and show. The evil was really evil, and the layers were peeled back slowly, slowly to the final climax. The ... Read full review

Contents

Sale of College Property
11
Dinner with the SubWarden
32
Belbury and St AnnesontheHill
50
The Liquidation of Anachronisms
72
Elasticity
92
Fog
116
The Pendragon 13 6
136
Moonlight at Belbury
157
Te Conquered City
202
Battle Begun
228
Wet and Windy Night
246
They Have Pulled Down Deep Heaven on Their Heads
268
Lie Is Meeting
292
The Descent of the Gods
317
Banquet at Belbury
340
V?mms a Si Awwes
357

The Saracens Head
178

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About the author (1996)

Clive Staples Lewis, born in Belfast, Ireland, in 1898, was for more than thirty years Fellow and Tutor of Magdalen College, Oxford, and at the time of his death in 1963 was professor of medieval and Renaissance literature at Cambridge University. His many books -- of fiction, poetry, theology, literary scholarship, and autobiography -- include The Screwtape Letters, Mere Christianity, Miracles, and the seven volumes that comprise The Chronicles of Narnia.

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