The dramatic works of Christopher Marlowe: (Selected.) With a prefatory notice, biographical and critical (Google eBook)

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W. Scott, 1885 - 209 pages
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Page 167 - Which, lightened by her neck, like diamonds shone. She ware no gloves; for neither sun nor wind Would burn or parch her hands, but, to her mind, Or warm or cool them, for they took delight To play upon those hands, they were so white.
Page 109 - Gallop apace, bright Phoebus, through the sky, And dusky night, in rusty iron car, Between you both shorten the time, I pray, That I may see that most desired day When we may meet these traitors in the field.
Page 38 - Give me the merchants of the Indian mines, That trade in metal of the purest mould ; The wealthy Moor, that in the eastern rocks Without control can pick his riches up, And in his house heap pearl like...
Page 33 - Her lips suck forth my soul; see where it flies! Come, Helen, come, give me my soul again. Here will I dwell, for Heaven is in these lips, And all is dross that is not Helena.
Page 120 - But stay awhile, let me be king till night, That I may gaze upon this glittering crown ; So shall my eyes receive their last content, My head, the latest honour due to it, And jointly both yield up their wished right. Continue ever thou celestial sun ; Let never silent night possess this clime : Stand still you watches...
Page 10 - And every warrior that is rapt with love Of fame, of valour, and of victory, Must needs have beauty beat on his conceits: I thus conceiving, and subduing both, That which hath stoop'd the chiefest of the gods, Even from the fiery-spangled veil of heaven, To feel the lovely warmth of shepherds...
Page 30 - Shall I make spirits fetch me what I please, Resolve me of all ambiguities, Perform what desperate enterprise I will? I'll have them fly to India for gold, Ransack the ocean for orient pearl, And search all corners of the new-found world For pleasant fruits and princely delicates...
Page 35 - O, no end is limited to damned souls ! Why wert thou not a creature wanting soul? Or why is this immortal that thou hast? Ah, Pythagoras' metempsychosis ! were that true, This soul should fly from me, and I be changed Unto some brutish beast!
Page 172 - When two are stript long ere the course begin, We wish that one should lose, the other win; And one especially do we affect Of two gold ingots, like in each respect: The reason no man knows; let it suffice, What we behold is censur'd by our eyes. Where both deliberate, the love is slight: Who ever lov'd, that lov'd not at first sight? He kneel'd; but unto her devoutly pray'd: Chaste Hero to herself thus softly said, " Were I the saint he worships, I would hear him; w And, as she spake those words,...

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