Alienation: Marx's Conception of Man in a Capitalist Society

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Cambridge University Press, 1976 - Philosophy - 339 pages
4 Reviews
In this book, the most thorough account of Marx's theory of alienation yet to have appeared in English, Professor Ollman reconstructs the theory from its constituent parts and offers it as a vantage point from which to view the rest of Marxism. The book further contains a detailed examination of Marx's philosophy of internal relations, the much neglected logical foudation of his method, and provides a systematic account of Marx's conception of human nature. Because of its almost unique concern with helping readers understand Marx's unusual use of language, Alienation has proven very popular in university courses on Marxism on both undergraduate and graduate levels. The first edition was widely reviewed, and in this new edition Professor Ollman replies to his critics in 'More on internal relations,' published here as Appendix II. In addition to this new appendix the author now provides a more systematic discussion of Marx's theory of ideology, elements of which were formerly dispersed throughout the book. He also attempts to set the treatment of political alienation within the broader framework of Marx's theory of the state as a model of how an approach based on internal relations can be used to integrate various apparently contradictory interpretations of Marx's views.
  

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Review: Alienation: Marx's Conception of Man in a Capitalist Society (Cambridge Studies in the History and Theory of Politics)

User Review  - Malcolm - Goodreads

Perhaps the most misunderstood and problematic aspect of Marxist theory is the approach to alienation, and as a result there is a tendency to put it to one side, or to treat alienation in a way that ... Read full review

Review: Alienation: Marx's Conception of Man in a Capitalist Society (Cambridge Studies in the History and Theory of Politics)

User Review  - Andrew - Goodreads

Came to this after attempting to read Marx's economic and philosophical manuscripts, which I frankly found confusing. This book is both incredibly lucid and very difficult, which is really just a way ... Read full review

Contents

With words that appear like bats
3
Social relations as subject matter
12
The philosophy of internal relations
26
Is there a Marxian ethic?
41
Dialectic as outlook
52
Dialectic as inquiry and exposition
61
Summary
69
MARXS CONCEPTION OF HUMAN NATURE
71
Mans relation to his product
141
Mans relation to his fellow men
147
Mans relation to his species
150
The capitalists alienation
153
The division of labor and private property
157
The labor theory of value laborpower
166
Value as alienated labor
174
The metamorphosis of value
187

Powers and needs
73
Natural man
77
Species man
82
Relating man to objects orientation perception
85
Appropriation
89
Nature as evidence
94
Activity work creativity
97
Mans social nature
104
The character of the species
109
Freedom as essence
114
Man classes people
120
Summary
126
THE THEORY OF ALIENATION
129
The theory of alienation
131
Mans relation to his productive activity
136
The fetishism of commodities
195
Class as a value Relation
202
State as a value Relation
212
Religion as a value Relation
221
Marxs critique of bourgeois ideology
227
Summary
233
CONCLUSION
235
A critical evaluation
237
Appendix I In defense of the philosophy of internal relations
256
more on internal relations
263
Notes to the text
277
Bibliography of works cited
320
Index of names and ideas
325
Copyright

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About the author (1976)

Jonathan Birnbaum is the editor of "Racial Profiling" (forthcoming) and the co-editor of "Civil Rights Since 1787: A Reader on the Black Struggle" (also available from NYU Press). His work has appeared in the "Guardian, " "New Politics, Socialism and Democracy, New Political Science, " and other publications.

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