The Missionary: An Indian Tale, Volumes 1-3 (Google eBook)

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Franklin Company, and by Butler and White, 1811 - India - 279 pages
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Page 77 - ... day, when I shall depart from this desolate mansion; shall seek rest for my soul; and shall follow the traces of my beloved ; ' Dancing, with love of His beauty, like a mote in a sunbeam, till I reach the spring and fountain of light, whence yon sun derives all his lustre.
Page 206 - ... lured his nature from its prey. Luxima, slowly awakening from her sweet repose to sounds too well remembered, for it was the vesper hymn of the Indian huntsmen, raised her head upon her arm, and threw wildly round her the look of one wrapt in visionary...
Page 57 - Silently gazing, in wonder, upon each other, they stood finely opposed, the noblest specimens of the human species, as it appears in the most opposite regions of the earth • she, like the East, lovely and luxuriant; he, like the West, lofty and commanding...
Page 239 - ... oppression — for men, however vicious individually, are generally virtuous in the mass : his fellow-travellers, therefore, boldly advanced, to rescue one, whose air and manner had captivated their imaginations. The passions of a multitude know no precise limit; the partisans of the Missionary only waited for the orders of him whom they were about to avenge : they said, " Shall we throw those men under tho camels feet ? or shall we bind them to those rocks, and leave them to their fate ?" The...
Page 274 - ... return to the blessed paradise of her nativity, thou wilt say — ' that having gathered a dark spotted flower in the garden of love, she expiates her error by the loss of her life ; that her disobedience to the forms of her religion, and the laws of her country, was punished by days of suffering, and by an untimely death; yet that her soul was pure from sin, as, when clothed in transcendant brightness, she outshone, in faith, in virtue, all women of her nation...
Page 90 - He would not submit to the analysis of his feelings, and he was determined to conquer, without understanding their nature or tendency. Entombed and chained within the most remote depths of his heart, he was deaf to their murmurs, and resisted their pleadings, with all the despotism of a great and lofty mind, created equally to command others and itself. With the dawn, therefore, of...
Page 177 - ... day. Here the proscribed wanderers paused ; they listened breathlessly, and gazed on every side ; for danger, perhaps death, surrounded them : but not a sound disturbed the mystic silence, save the low murmurs of a gushing spring which fell with more than mortal music from a mossy cliff, sparkling among the matted roots of overhanging trees, and gliding, like liquid silver, beneath the net-work of the parasite plants. The flowers of the Mangoosten gave to the fresh air a balmy fragrance. The...
Page 82 - Luxima, gazing and listening, •stood rapt in wonder and amazement, in a we. and admiration. She heard her name tenderly pronounced, and inseparably connected with supplication to Heaven in her behalf: she beheld tears, and listened to. sighs, of which she alone was the object, and which were made as offerings to the suppliant's God, that she might embrace a mode of belief, to whose existence, until now, she was almost a stranger. Professing, herself, a religion which unites the most boundless toleration...
Page 261 - A sudden impulse was given to feelings long suppressed: the timid spirits of the Hindus rallied to an event which touched their hearts, and roused .. them from their lethargy of despair; — the sufferings, the oppression, they had so long endured, seemed now epitomized before their eyes, in the person of their celebrated and distinguished Prophetess — they believed it was their god who addressed them from her lips — they rushed forward with a hideous cry to rescue his priestess, and to avenge...
Page 92 - ... as emulous of the parent greatness, throws out its fibrous roots, and, fastening in the earth, becomes independent, without being disunited from the ancient and original stem. Thus, in various directions, proceeds the living arcade, whose great and splendid order the. Architect of the universe himself designed ; while above the leafy canopy descend festoons of sprays and fibres, which, progressively maturing, branch off in lighter arches, extending the growing fabric from season to season, and...

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