Sannillac: A Poem (Google eBook)

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Carter and Babcock, 1831 - Indians of North America - 155 pages
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Page 137 - Ah, aid me, ye spirits! of water, of earth, and of sky, while I sing in his praise; and my voice shall be heard, it shall ring through the sky; and echo, repeating the same, shall cause it to swell in the...
Page 4 - ... Who sees it rise, like giant mound, O'erlooking all the region round, The clust'ring islands, sever'd main, And straits drawn out, like liquid chain ; And as his light canoe draws near, He stays awhile its fleet career, That, off'ring up a simple prayer, And leaving simple tribute there, The Manitou, whom fancy sees Enshrouded 'mong the rocks and trees, May send him on his course with fav'ring breeze.
Page 140 - ... present feelings of the Indians. The designation was official, and not personal, and the office was hereditary in the direct male line. He was supported by voluntary contributions, his mushinawa, or provider, making known from time to time his necessities by public proclamation. Whatever was required on these occasions, whether food or clothing, was immediately furnished. He appears to have been the chief priest, and could neither engage in war nor hunting.
Page 140 - Mutch-e-ke-wis, who exercised more authority, and assumed more state, than would be compatible with the present feelings of the Indians. The designation was official, and not personal; and the office was hereditary in the direct male line. * * He appears to have been the chief priest, and could neither engage in war nor hunting.
Page 3 - On Huron's wave there stands an isle, Which lifts on high its tower-like pile, Guarding the strait, whose promont sides Press into union various tides, From broad Superior rushing down, Chill'd with the arctic winter's frown, Or coming up from milder skies, Where Michigania's sources rise. This isle by wild tradition long Made theme of forest tale and song In ev'ry age has caught the eye Of Indian, as he wanders by, Who sees it rise, like giant mound, O'erlooking all the region round, The...
Page 138 - ... singular was an institution for the ' preservation of an eternal fire. ' All the rites and duties connected with it, are yet fresh in the recollection of the Indians ; and it was extinguished after the French arrived upon the great lakes. The prevalence of a similar custom among the nations of the East, from a very early period, is well known to all, who have traced the history and progress of human superstitions. And from them it found its way to Greece, and eventually to Rome. It is not, perhaps,...
Page 137 - Indian girl, enamored of the fame and personal endowments of a youthful chief, are transferred from the dialect in which they were originally conceived, with as few changes as the idiom of an unwritten, and consequently an unsettled language, rendered indispensable. My lover is tall and handsome, as the mountain ash,* when red with berries. He is swift in his course as the stately Addick.t His hair is dark and flowing, as the black bird in spring, and his eye, like the eagle's, is piercing and bright....
Page 139 - ... Chippewa name of Mud-je-ke-wis means " a magistrate ruling by descent of blood" hence, an hereditary chief, f Appended to Colonel Henry Whitings' Aboriginal poem of Sannillac, is a note furnished by General Lewis Cass, relative to the " sacred fire " of the Indians, in which this passage occurs: " The Chippewa tribe formerly inhabited the regions around Lake Superior; and its council-house, and the seat of the eternal fire, were west of Keeweenau Point. Here lived the principal chief, called...
Page 139 - Chippewas in fact assert, that they received their fire from the latter. But there is such a similarity, and even identity of manners and customs among all the tribes east of the Mississippi, that I have but little doubt, the same institution would be everywhere discovered, if inquiries were prosecuted under favorable circumstances. It is certain, that the Natchez were fire-worshippers, and without giving full credit to all the marvellous tales related of this tribe by the early French travellers,...
Page 19 - To show where once throng'd mighty race. Perhaps on banks of many a stream, Sloping beneath the day's warm beam, Tribes may have liv'd from sire to son, And down through generations run, Laying their bones within the mound, Where all their gather'd sires were found, And yet the place no sign disclose Save this rude tomb that ever there The hum of men had fill'd the air, And broke through nature's wild repose.

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