An Ecclesiastical History, Ancient and Modern: From the Birth of Christ, to the Beginning of the Present Century : in which the Rise, Progress, and Variations of Church Power, are Considered in Their Connection with the State of Learning and Philosophy, and the Political History of Europe During that Period, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

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Samuel Etheridge, 1811 - Church history
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Page 210 - I saw a woman sit upon a scarlet coloured beast, full of names of blasphemy, having seven heads and ten horns. And the woman was arrayed in purple and scarlet colour, and decked with gold and precious stones and pearls, having a golden cup in her hand full of abominations and filthiness of her fornication...
Page 192 - Provide neither gold, nor silver, nor brass in your purses, nor scrip for your journey; neither two coats, neither shoes, nor yt staves : for the workman is worthy of his meat.
Page 53 - Thou shalt tread upon the lion and adder: the young lion and the dragon shalt thou trample under feet.
Page 114 - This feformer rejected the baptism of infants, severely censured the corrupt manners of the clergy, treated the festivals and ceremonies of the church with the utmost contempt, and held private assemblies for inculcating his peculiar doctrines.
Page 400 - Rome was entirely groundless. However, his enemies so far prevailed, that by the most scandalous breach of public faith, he was cast into prison, declared a heretic, because he refused to plead guilty against the dictates of his conscience...
Page 399 - Wickliffe, as far as they related to the papal hierarchy, the despotism of the court of Rome, and the corruption of the clergy. Hence an accusation was brought against him in the year 1410, before the tribunal of John XXIII. by whom he was solemnly expelled from the communion of the church.
Page 83 - ... and which were therefore applicable to the benefit of others; that the guardian and dispenser of this precious treasure was the Roman pontiff; and that of consequence he was empowered to assign to such as he thought proper, a portion of this inexhaustible source of merit, suitable...
Page 348 - Flanders, and were supported partly by their manual labours, and partly by the charitable donations of pious persons. The magistrates and inhabitants of the towns where these brethren and sisters resided gave them particular marks of favour and protection, on account of their great usefulness to the sick and needy. They were thus...
Page 347 - Lollards, because they were public singers, who made it their business to inter the bodies of those who died of the plague, and sang a dirge over them, in a mournful and indistinct tone, as they carried them to the grave. The name was...
Page 457 - There are men whose powers operate only at leisure and in retirement, and whose intellectual vigour deserts them in conversation ; whom merriment confuses, and objection disconcerts : whose bashfulness restrains their exertion, and suffers them not to speak till the time of speaking is past ; or whose attention to their own character makes them unwilling to utter at hazard what has not been considered, and cannot be recalled.

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