Tent and harem: notes of an oriental trip (Google eBook)

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D. Appleton and Co., 1859 - Middle East - 300 pages
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Page 268 - ... and the sound of a trumpet, and the voice of words; which voice they that heard entreated that the word should not be spoken to them any more; (for they could not endure that which was commanded, And if so much as a beast touch the mountain, it shall be stoned, or thrust through with a dart: and so terrible was the sight, that Moses said, I exceedingly fear and quake...
Page 255 - And they came to Elim, where were twelve wells of water, and threescore and ten palm trees : and they encamped there by the waters.
Page 213 - Below are others carrying vases, apparently of water, and some machinery connected with the transport of the statue, followed by task-masters, with their wands of office. On the knee of the figure stands a man, who claps his hands to the measured cadence of a song, to mark the...
Page 214 - ... task-masters with their wands of office. On the knee of the figure stands a man who claps his hands to the measured cadence of a song, to mark the time and ensure their simultaneous draught; for it is evident that in order that the whole power might be applied at the same instant, a sign of this kind was necessary ; and the custom of singing at their work { was common to every occupation of the Egyptians, as it now is in that country, in India, and many other places.
Page 172 - ... awful, grand. The most striking specimens of this gigantic architecture, are the great colonnade at Luksor, which we first visited by moonlight ; and especially the grand hall at Karnak, " one hundred and seventy feet by three hundred and twenty-nine, supported by a central avenue of twelve massive columns, sixty-six feet high (without the pedestal and abacus), and twelve in diameter; besides one hundred and twenty-two of smaller or rather less gigantic dimensions, forty-one feet nine inches...
Page 121 - I found the Nubians, generally, to be of a kind disposition, and without that propensity to theft so characteristic of the Egyptians, at least of those to the north of Siout. Pilfering indeed is almost unknown amongst them, and any person convicted of such a crime would be expelled from his village by the unanimous voice of its inhabitants ; I did not lose the most trifling article during my journey through the country, although I always slept in the open air in front of the house where I took up...
Page 214 - It was bound to the sledge by double ropes, tightened by means of long pegs inserted between them and twisted round until they were completely braced; and, to prevent injury from the friction of the ropes, a compress of leather, lead, or other substance was introduced between them and the stone. Before the figure a priestly scribe is presenting incense in honour...
Page 229 - In its present state, its proportions cannot be obtained ; but Sir G. Wilkinson tells us,* " Pliny says it measured from the belly to the highest part of the head sixty-three feet : its length was one hundred and forty-three ; and the circumference of its head round the forehead one hundred and two feet : all cut out in the natural rock and worked smooth.
Page 213 - He was a person of distinction in the military caste : he is styled in the hieroglyphics " the king's friend :" and one of his children was named Osirtasen, after the king. One hundred and seventy-two men, in 4 rows of 43 each, pull the ropes attached to a ring in front of the sledge ; and a liquid, perhaps grease, or water, is poured from a vase by a person standing on the pedestal of the statue, in order to facilitate its progress...
Page 213 - ... grease is poured from a vase by a person standing on the pedestal of the statue, in order to facilitate its progress as it slides over the ground, which was probably covered with a bed of planks, though they are not indicated in the painting.

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