Soulstorm: Stories

Front Cover
New Directions Publishing, 1989 - Fiction - 175 pages
9 Reviews
'Soulstorm' contains twenty-nine stories of the brazilian writer Clarice Lispector. They were originally published in two separate volumes, 'The Stations of the Body' and 'Where you were at Night'. Like James Joyce's 'Dubliners', Lispector's characters live small stifled lives, often unware of their own suffering, but her lucid and richly textured narratives allow us, the readers, the epiphanies that they themselves are denied.
  

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Review: Soulstorm

User Review  - Mark - Goodreads

Lispector's stories are as razor-sharp as Diane Williams, and with a unique fragility that lets the reader feel the timidity of her narrators. Excellent collection. Read full review

Review: Soulstorm

User Review  - missy ward-lambert - Goodreads

This book contains two short story collections, and I liked the first collection much better than the second. Which surprised me, because Lispector admits she wrote most of the first collection in a ... Read full review

Contents

Explanation
3
The Body
16
The Way of the Cross
25
He Soaked Me Up
36
Day by Day
43
A Complicated Case
50
Pig Latin
59
But Its Going to Rain
66
In Search of Dignity
73
The Departure of the Train
85
Dry Point of Horses
106
Where You Were at Night
114
A Report on a Thing
131
A Manifesto of the City
141
AFTERWORD BY Alexis Levitin
171
Copyright

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About the author (1989)

Clarice Lispector was born in the Ukraine and was taken to Brazil as a young child. She was a law student, editor, translator, and newswriter, who traveled widely, spending eight years in the United States. "Family Ties" (1960) is a collection of short stories revealing Lispector's existentialist view of life and demonstrating that even family ties and social relationships are temporary. Although tied to each other and to the outside world, the characters are finally totally alone and separate. Lispector received praise from American critics for "The Apple in the Dark" (1967), a novel about a guilt-ridden man's search for the ultimate knowledge (Eve's apple), which he believes will bring him hope. Lispector's books are being translated into various languages in Europe, especially in France, where the critic Helene Cixous is one of her great admirers and a promoter of her works.

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