Thirteen Moons on Turtle's Back: A Native American Year of Moons

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Spoken Arts, 1997 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 32 pages
19 Reviews
In many Native American cultures it is believed that the thirteen scales on Turtle's shell stand for the thirteen cycles of the moon, each with its own name and a story that relates to the changing seasons. Storyteller and American Book Award recipient Joseph Bruchac and poet Jonathan London collaborate to reveal the beauty of the natural world around us, while Thomas Locker's spectacular oil paintings honor both Native American legends and the varied American landscape.

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Review: Thirteen Moons on Turtle's Back

User Review  - Alysha DeShaé - Goodreads

An interesting and educational book about Native American moon legends. Read full review

Review: Thirteen Moons on Turtle's Back

User Review  - Beverly J. - Goodreads

Absolutely outstanding book. What an amazing thrift store find for .20 cents. Wonderful illustrations and fantastic use of ode form to explain each moon from 13 different tribes. Read full review

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About the author (1997)

Joseph Bruchac is the author of Skeleton Man, The Return of Skeleton Man, Bearwalker, The Dark Pond, and Whisper in the Dark, as well as numerous other critically acclaimed novels, poems, and stories, many drawing on his Abenaki heritage. Mr. Bruchac and his wife, Carol, live in upstate New York, in the same house where he was raised by his grandparents.

Jonathan London was born a "navy-brat" in Brooklyn, New York, and raised on Naval stations throughout the U.S. and Puerto Rico. He received a Masters Degree in Social Sciences but never formally studied literature or creative writing. He began to consider himself a writer about the time he graduated from college. After college he became a dancer in a modern dance company and worked at numerous low-paying jobs as a laborer or counselor. He wrote poems and short stories for adults, earning next to nothing despite being published in many literary magazines. For some 20 years before he penned his first children's book, London was writing poetry and short stories for adults. In the early 1970s, he was reading his poems in San Francisco jazz clubs, and those experiences found their way into his witty children's book Hip Cat, which has been featured on the PBS children's television show Reading Rainbow. After writing down the tale The Olw Who Became the Moon in 1989, London began to wonder if other people might want to read it. He picked up his kids' copy of Winnie-the-Pooh and saw that the book was published by Dutton, so he casually decided to send his story to them. Surprisingly enough, they wanted to publish him. Working with different illustrators, and occasionally with co-authors, London has produced literally dozens of books. Most have appeared under his name, but some have come out under a pseudonym, which still remains a secret.He has published over forty books and has earned recognitions from organizations like the National Science Teachers Association.

Thomas Locker was born in New York City in 1937. In the 1960s, he began his career as a landscape painter. In 1982, he decided to try his hand at writing and illustrating children's books. His first, Where the River Begins, was named one of the 10 best illustrated children's books of 1984 in the New York Times Book Review. During his lifetime, he illustrated more than 30 children and young adult books, several of which he also wrote. Some of his works include John Muir: America's Naturalist, Anna and the Bagpiper, The Ice Horse, and The Man who Paints Nature. The books he worked on have received numerous awards including the Christopher Award, the John Burroughs Award, and the New York Times Award for best illustration. He died on March 9, 2012 at the age of 74.

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