Letters ... to sir Horace Mann, ed. by lord Dover. Concluding ser (Google eBook)

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Page 227 - Fair laughs the morn, and soft the zephyr blows While proudly riding o'er the azure realm In gallant trim the gilded vessel goes; Youth on the prow, and pleasure at the helm; Regardless of the sweeping whirlwind's sway, That, hush'd in grim repose, expects his evening prey.
Page 296 - Having terminated his disputes with every enemy and every rival, who buried their mutual animosities in their common detestation against the creditors of the Nabob of Arcot, he drew from every quarter whatever a savage ferocity could add to his new rudiments in the arts of destruction ; and compounding all the materials of fury, havoc, and desolation into one black cloud, he hung for awhile on the declivities of the mountains.
Page 297 - All the horrors of war before known or heard of, were mercy to that new havoc. A storm of universal fire blasted every field, consumed every house, destroyed every temple. The miserable inhabitants flying from their flaming villages, in part were slaughtered; others, without regard to sex, to age, to the respect of rank, or sacredness of function, fathers torn from children, husbands from wives, enveloped in a whirlwind of cavalry, and amidst the goading spears of drivers, and the trampling of pursuing...
Page 43 - To this sad shrine, whoe'er thou art, draw near, Here lies the friend most lov'd, the son most dear: Who ne'er knew joy, but friendship might divide, Or gave his father grief but when he dy'd.
Page 228 - That the influence of the Crown has increased, is increasing, and ought to be diminished"?
Page 6 - It was circulated with profusion, and, for writing it, the Common Council of London voted the Doctor their thanks, and presented him with the freedom of the city in a gold box.
Page 413 - ... Abundant in humour, observation, fancy ; in extensive knowledge of books and men ; in palpable hits of character, exquisite, grave, irony, and the most whimsical indulgence in point of epigram.
Page 361 - Conway moved an address to implore his majesty " to listen to the advice of his Commons, that the war in America might no longer be pursued for the impracticable purpose of reducing the inhabitants of that country to obedience...
Page 154 - To VIRTUE ONLY and HER FRIENDS A FRIEND, The world beside may murmur, or commend. Know, all the distant din that world can keep, Rolls o'er my grotto, and but soothes my sleep. There, my retreat the best companions grace, Chiefs out of war, and statesmen out of place.
Page 118 - At this man's table I enjoyed many cheerful and instructive hours, with companions such as are not often found; with one who has lengthened, and one who has gladdened life; with Dr. James, whose skill in...

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