The Cambridge Companion to the Roman Economy

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Walter Scheidel
Cambridge University Press, Nov 8, 2012 - Business & Economics - 443 pages
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The Cambridge Companion to the Roman Economy offers readers a comprehensive and innovative introduction to the economy of the Roman Empire. Focusing on the principal determinants, features, and consequences of Roman economic development and integrating additional web-based materials, it is designed as an up-to-date survey that is accessible to all audiences. Five main sections discuss theoretical approaches drawn from Economics, labor regimes, the production of power and goods, various means of distribution from markets to predation, and the success and ultimate failure of the Roman economy. The book not only covers traditionally prominent features such as slavery, food production, and monetization but also highlights the importance of previously neglected aspects such as the role of human capital, energy generation, rent-taking, logistics, and human wellbeing, and convenes a group of five experts to debate the nature of Roman trade.
  

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Contents

Approaching the Roman economy
3
THEORY
25
PARTIILAEOR
89
PRODUCTION
133
Manufacturing
175
IO Predation
197
I2 Urbanisrn
241
Money and finance
266
I4 A forum on trade
287
IS Physical Wellbeing
321
PostRoman economies
334
Further reading
361
Index
416
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Walter Scheidel is Dickason Professor in the Humanities and Professor of Classics and History at Stanford University. He is the author or editor of a dozen books on the ancient world, including The Cambridge Economic History of the Greco-Roman World (with Ian Morris and Richard Saller, 2007). His work, which has focused on ancient social and economic history, historical demography and the history of empire, has been widely recognized for its innovative quantitative and comparative modelling, cross-cultural scope and transdisciplinary breadth across the social sciences and life sciences.

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