Science Fiction and Philosophy: From Time Travel to Superintelligence (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Susan Schneider
John Wiley & Sons, Jun 3, 2010 - Philosophy - 368 pages
9 Reviews
A timely volume that uses science fiction as a springboard to meaningful philosophical discussions, especially at points of contact between science fiction and new scientific developments.
  • Raises questions and examines timely themes concerning the nature of the mind, time travel, artificial intelligence, neural enhancement, free will, the nature of persons, transhumanism, virtual reality, and neuroethics
  • Draws on a broad range of books, films and television series, including The Matrix, Star Trek, Blade Runner, Frankenstein, Brave New World, The Time Machine, and Back to the Future
  • Considers†the classic philosophical puzzles that appeal to the general reader, while also exploring new topics of interest to the more seasoned academic
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
2
4 stars
2
3 stars
3
2 stars
1
1 star
1

Review: Science Fiction and Philosophy: From Time Travel to Superintelligence

User Review  - Dexter - Goodreads

To me the best science fictions tackles perplexing philosophical questions and carries out philosophical thought experiments through an artistic and scientific narrative. The fictional aspect of good ... Read full review

Review: Science Fiction and Philosophy: From Time Travel to Superintelligence

User Review  - Matt - Goodreads

A bit scattered, and I found some contributions to be more worthwhile than others. A few even seemed downright out of place, though I'm forced to concede that they are in fact works of philosophy ... Read full review

Contents

1 Good and Bad Grounds for Skepticism
A Humanoid Robot
3 Some Philosophical Considerations
References
The Intuitive Linear View Versus the Historical Exponential View
The Six Epochs
The Singularity Is Near
Holy Wars

Conclusion
Notes
References
Of the Things of which we May Doubt
I Brains in Vats
II Envatment Reconsidered
III The Metaphysical hypothesis
IV The Matrix Hypothesis as a Metaphysical Hypothesis
V Life in the Matrix
VI Objections
VII Other Skeptical Hypotheses
Note
Note
1 The Problems of Personal Identity
2 Understanding the Persistence Question
3 Accounts of Our Identity Through Time
4 The Psychological Approach
5 Fission
6 The TooManyThinkers Problem
7 The Somatic Approach
8 Wider Issues
References
Internet Resources
The Ego Theory and the Bundle Theory
What we Believe Ourselves to Be
How we are not What we Believe
How the SplitBrain Cases Support the Bundle Theory
Notes
Hard Determinism and the Threat to Free Will
The Soft Determinist Gambit
On Behalf of Freedom
The Verdict on Precrime
Notes
1 Machine Intelligence
2 Intelligence and Intentionality
3 Functionalism and the Language of Thought
4 Searles Chinese Room Argument
Notes
References
Rats in Space
Implant and Mergers
A Day in the Life
Dovetailing
Unholy Wars
The Man on the Moon
Genetic Engineering
Toward the Posthuman
New Crusades
The Transhumanist Position
The Nature of Persons
Robert SawyersMindscanand the Reduplication Problem
A Response to the Reduplication Problem
Two Issues that Modified Patternism Needs to Address
Conclusion
Notes
References
Introduction
The Bicentennial Man
Machine Metaethics
Characteristics Necessary To Have Moral Standing
Why The Three Laws Are Unsatisfactory Even If Machines Dont Have Moral Standing
Conclusion
References
1 Introduction
2 Superintelligence is Different
3 Superintelligent Moral Thinking
4 Importance of Initial Motivations
5 Should Development be Delayed or Accelerated?
References
The Flow of Time
The SpaceTime Theory
Change Motion Causes
Note
Notes
1
2
3
4
5
6
Humeans on Miracles
Three Modern Miracle Mongers
Simulation Epistemology and Metaphysics
An Argument for Miracles
References
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2010)

Susan Schneider is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Philosophy, University of Pennsylvania, and a faculty member in Pennís Neuroethics program, its Institute for Research in Cognitive Science, and its Center for Cognitive Neuroscience. She is also a fellow with the Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies. She is the author of numerous pieces in philosophy of mind, neuroethics, and metaphysics, and has co-edited The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness (Wiley-Blackwell, 2007) with Max Velmans.

Bibliographic information