Over the Sea and Far Away: Being a Narrative of Wanderings Around the World (Google eBook)

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Longmans, Green, and Company, 1876 - California - 416 pages
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Page 178 - In the afternoon they came unto a land In which it seemed always afternoon. All round the coast the languid air did swoon, Breathing like one that hath a, weary dream.
Page 178 - We will return no more;" And all at once they sang, " Our island home Is far beyond the wave; we will no longer roam." CHORIC SONG "THERE is sweet music here that softer falls Than petals from blown roses on the grass, Or night-dews on still waters between walls Of shadowy granite, in a gleaming pass; Music that gentlier on the spirit lies, Than tir'd eyelids upon tir'd eyes; Music that brings sweet sleep down from the blissful skies. Here are cool mosses deep, And thro...
Page 266 - ... By far the most remarkable accumulation of this kind in the West, I may observe, was the Great Raft, obstructing the navigation of Red River a few hundred miles above its point of junction with the Mississippi, where, owing to natural causes, a compact body of floating timber, one hundred and forty miles long, and from half a mile to a mile in breadth, interposed* till lately, a stupendous and yearly increasing barrier to the navigation of the higher parts of the river. That this should ever...
Page 271 - ... comparatively recent period, geologically speaking, as is conclusively demonstrated in numerous localities. At the Abbey's Ferry crossing of the Stanislaus, for instance, a portion of the mass of Table Mountain is seen on each side of the river, in such a position as to demonstrate that the current of the lava which forms the summit of this mountain once flowed continuously across what is now a canon over 2,000 feet deep, showing that the erosion of that immense gorge has all been effected since...
Page 59 - ... the kelp. Amidst the leaves of this plant numerous species of fish live, which nowhere else could find food or shelter; with their destruction the many cormorants and other fishing birds, the otters, seals, and porpoises, would soon perish also; and lastly, the Fuegian savage, the miserable lord of this miserable land, would redouble his cannibal feast, decrease in numbers, and perhaps cease to exist.
Page 271 - Capitan, where two perpendicular surfaces of smooth granite, more than 3,000 feet high, meet each other at a right angle. It is sufficient to look for a moment at the vertical faces of El Capitan and the Bridal Veil Rock, turned down the Valley, or away from the direction in which the eroding forces must have acted, to be able to say that aqueous erosion could not have been the agent employed to do any such work. The squarely cut re-entering angles, like those below El Capitan, and between Cathedral...
Page 135 - The body was placed in a squatting posture, with the knees drawn up, and the hands applied to the sides of the head. The whole was enveloped in a coarse but close fabric, with stripes of red, which has withstood wonderfully the destroying effects of ages, for these interments were made before the conquest, though at what period is not known.
Page 135 - The body (to which this head belonged) was placed in a squatting posture, with the knees drawn up and the hands applied to the sides. The whole was enveloped in. a coarse, but close fabric, with stripes of red, which has withstood...
Page 361 - ... of their superstitions are extremely curious. The goddess Kwan-on is much trusted as a reliever of pain; among the famous tableaux exhibited at Asakusa is one "of a man suffering from violent headache, who is directed by Kwan-on to the spot where the buried skull which belonged to him in a former state of existence is being split open by the root of a tree which is growing through the eye-socket.
Page 271 - ... impetuous velocity down the slopes of the mountains, has excavated those immense gorges by which the chain of the Sierra Nevada is furrowed, on its western slope, to the depth of thousands of feet. This erosion, great as it is, has been done within a comparatively recent period, geologically speaking, as is conclusively demonstrated in numerous localities. At the Abbey's Ferry crossing of the Stanislaus, for instance, a portion of the mass of Table Mountain is seen on each side of the river,...

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