The White House Physician: A History from Washington to George W. Bush

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McFarland, Jul 30, 2007 - Biography & Autobiography - 266 pages
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When President George Washington fell ill six short weeks after his inauguration, he summoned Samuel Bard, one of the most prominent physicians of the day. Thereafter, when residing at his presidential home in Manhattan, Washington consistently relied on Bard for medical care. Thus Bard became the first in a line of presidential physicians, the providers of medical care for America's chief executive. From George Washington to George W. Bush, this volume examines 217 years of health care in the White House and the men and women who ministered to these presidential patients. Beginning with that first presidential physician's visit on June 13, 1789, it analyzes the relationships--sometimes fruitful and sometimes disastrous--of the presidents with their physicians. While biographical sketches detailing the background of each physician are included, the main focus of the work is the especially complex physician-patient relationship and the ways in which it has changed over time. The evolution of the presidential physician's responsibilities is also discussed, as are developments in American medicine during presidential terms.
  

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Contents

Introduction
3
Presidential Physicians
20
The Early Days
32
Conflicts and Cooperation
42
The First Authentic
62
6Captain Joel Boone and the Institutionalization
75
Doctors Cary
87
The Returnee the Academic
110
Medical Chaos in Camelot
122
The Specialist Physicians
138
12The TwentyFifth Amendment and Its Impact on
159
14The Medical Care of Vice Presidents
179
15Presidential Physicians After Their Tenures
192
Chapter Notes
207
Bibliography
237
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About the author (2007)

Ludwig M. Deppisch, M.D., is a pathologist. A native of New York, he lives in Tucson, Arizona.

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