Language History, Language Change, and Language Relationship: An Introduction to Historical and Comparative Linguistics (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Walter de Gruyter, Aug 17, 2009 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 588 pages
0 Reviews
Why does language change? Why can we speak to and understand our parents but have trouble reading Shakespeare? Why is Chaucer's English of the fourteenth century so different from Modern English of the late twentieth century that the two are essentially different languages? Why are Americans and English 'one people divided by a common language'? And how can the language of Chaucer and Modern English - or Modern British and American English - still be called the same language? The present book provides answers to questions like these in a straightforward way, aimed at the non-specialist, with ample illustrations from both familiar and more exotic languages. Most chapters in this new edition have been reworked, with some difficult passages removed, other passages thoroughly rewritten, and several new sections added, e.g. on language and race and on Indian writing systems. Further, the chapter notes and bibliography have all been updated.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Chapter 1 Introduction
3
Chapter 2 The discovery of IndoEuropean
34
Its history and its decipherment
63
Chapter 4 Sound change
113
Chapter 5 Analogy and change in word structure
150
Chapter 6 Syntactic change
183
Chapter 7 Semantic change
205
Chapter 8 Lexical borrowing
241
Chapter 12 Language spread link languages and bilingualism
349
Dialectology beyond languageboundaries
370
Chapter 14 Pidgins creoles and related forms of language
392
Chapter 15 Language death
419
Establishing language relationship
427
The question of longdistance genetic relationships
455
Linguistic paleontology and other applications of our methods
477
Chapter notes and suggested readings
510

The study of words
279
Chapter 10 Language dialect and standard
307
Chapter 11 Dialect geography and dialectology
332
Backmatter
533
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

Hans Henrich Hock, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA; Brian D. Joseph, Ohio State University, USA.

Bibliographic information