GREAT DIVIDE

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Aug 12, 1988 - History - 439 pages
3 Reviews
Studs Terkel interviews three college teachers, four farmers, a high school teacher, neighborhood organizer, stock broker, advertising executive, businesswomen, real estate broker, dentist, doctor, blue collar worker, professional strikebreaker, columnist, unemployed steelworker, lawyer, flight attendant, bartender, CPA, woman engineer, socialite, Congressman, nuclear physicist, author, waitress, KKK member, storyteller, gay activist, sanctuary worker, Christian fundamentalist, Tony Bouza, Erica Bouza, Maggie Kuhn, Victor Reuther, and peace activists Jean and Joe Gump.

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Review: The Great Divide

User Review  - Michael - Goodreads

Anyone familiar with Terkel will know what to expect with this interview collection. For the most part the people interviewed are ordinary people struggling financially oe barely skimmimg by. It is ... Read full review

Review: The Great Divide

User Review  - Jason - Goodreads

This is a study on the effect of Reagonomics. It is documented at the end of the eighties, when the deregulation boon made life for some outrageously profitable, and really screwed over Labor, small ... Read full review

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Contents

SCHOOL DAYS
23
FAMILY CIRCLE
57
FAMILY FARMER
83
Copyright

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About the author (1988)

Studs Terkel was an actor, writer, and radio host. He was born Louis Terkel on May 16, 1912 in New York City. He took his name from the James T. Farrell novel, Studs Lonigan. Terkel attended the University of Chicago and graduated with a law degree in 1934. Terkel acted in local stage productions and on radio dramas until he began one of the first television programs, an unscripted show called Studs Place in the early 1950s. In 1952, Terkel began Studs Terkel's Almanac on radio station WFMT in Chicago. Terkel compiled a series of books based on oral histories that defined America in the 20th Century. Working: People Talk About What They Do All Day and How They Feel About What They Do received a National Book Award nomination in 1975. The Good War: An Oral History of World War II won the Pulitzer Prize in nonfiction in 1985. Working was turned into a hit musical in 1978. Terkel was named the Communicator of the Year by the University of Chicago in 1969. He also won a Peabody Award for excellence in journalism in 1980 and the National Book Foundation Medal for contributions to American letters in 1997. He died on October 31, 2008 at the age of 96.

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