The Liber Amoris; Or, New Pygmalion

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ReadHowYouWant.com, Jan 1, 2006 - Fiction - 180 pages
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It is a narration with autobiographical touches. There is a thoughtful and charming account of the experiences and observations of the author. The love-story encompasses all his pains, sorrows and desires. A heart-felt book, it offers a deep analysis of human feelings.
  

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Contents

THE PICTURE
1
THE CONFESSION
16
THE RECONCILIATION
30
WRITTEN IN A BLANK LEAF OF ENDYMION
44
LETTER VI
61
A THOUGHT
75
LETTER XI
88
UNALTERED LOVE
94
LETTER THE LAST
108
TO THE SAME
131
TO THE SAME
158
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About the author (2006)

The son of an Irish Unitarian minister, William Hazlitt was born on April 10, 1778 in Maidstone, England. As a young man, Hazlitt studied for the ministry at Hackney College in London, but eventually realized that he wasn't committed to becoming a minister, so he began a career as a writer, an occupation he would follow for the rest of his life. In 1817, Hazlitt published his first book of essays, Round Table. This work was followed by Table Talk in 1821, Spirit of the Age in 1825, Plain Speaker in 1826, and his last lengthy piece, The Life of Napoleon, in 1830. Considered one of the most important English writers of all times, Hazlitt was a contemporary and friend of Samuel Coleridge, William Wordsworth, and Charles Lamb. William Hazlitt died on September 18, 1830. He is buried in St. Anne's churchyard in Soho, England.

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