History of the Invasion and Capture of Washington: And the Events which Preceded and Followed (Google eBook)

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Harper, 1857 - United States - 371 pages
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Page 259 - Judging it of consequence to complete the destruction of the public buildings with the least possible delay, so that the army might retire without loss of time, the following buildings were set fire to and consumed.
Page 20 - ... of the United States; and as such a system, if not counteracted, will have the effect of diminishing very materially the pressure of the war on the enemy, and encouraging a perseverance in it, at the same time that it will leave the general commerce of the United States under all the pressure the enemy can impose, thus subjecting the whole to British regulation in subserviency to British monopoly, I recommend to the consideration of Congress the expediency of an immediate and effectual prohibition...
Page 133 - Patuxent, this afforded a pretext for ascending that river to attack him near its source, above Pig Point, while the ultimate destination of the combined force was Washington, should it be found that the attempt might be made with any prospect of success.
Page 53 - At or near the time appointed, the secretaries of state, treasury, war, and navy, and the attorney general assembled. The president stated the object of the meeting to be the consideration of the menacing aspect of things, in consequence of the augmented power of the enemy by the great political changes which had taken place in Europe, and the disposition manifested by the...
Page 290 - That, in case the British vessels should pass the fort, or their forces approach the town by land, and there should be no sufficient force, on our part, to oppose them with any reasonable prospect of success, they should appoint a committee to carry a flag to the officer commanding the enemy's force about to attack the town, and to procure the best terms for the safety of persons, houses, and property in their power.
Page 133 - Gordon, of his majesty's ship Seahorse, with that ship and the ships and bombs named in the margin, up the Potomac to bombard Fort Washington (which is situated on the left bank of that river, about ten or twelve miles below the city), with a view of destroying that fort and opening a free communication above, as well as to cover the retreat of the army, should its return by the...
Page 225 - Sterett, being the left of Stansbury's line, to advance and sustain the artillery. They promptly commenced this movement; but the rockets, which had, for the first three or four, passed very high above the heads of the line, now received a more horizontal direction, and passed very close above the heads of Shutz's and Ragan's regiments, composing the centre and left of Stansbury's line. A universal flight of these two regiments was the consequence. This leaving the right of the...
Page 254 - ... they wantonly destroyed the public edifices, having no relation in their structure to operations of war, nor used at the time for military annoyance...
Page 327 - ... enemy from taking him on the flanks as well as in front ; and that no reasonable hope could be entertained, that any of the troops could be relied on to make a resistance as desperate as necessary, in an isolated building, which could not be supported by a sufficiency of troops without : indeed it would have taken nearly the whole of the troops, he said, to have sufficiently filled the two wings, which would have left the enemy masters of every other part of the city, and given him the opportunity,...
Page 133 - ... destination of the combined force was Washington, should it be found that the attempt might be made with any prospect of success. To give their lordships a more correct idea of the place of attack, I send a sketch of the country upon which the movements of the army and navy are pourtrayed ; by...

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