Introduction to Prakrit (Google eBook)

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Motilal Banarsidass Publ., 1986 - Prakrit languages - 235 pages
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Introduction to Prakrit provides the reader with a guide for the more attentive and scholarly study of Prakrit occurring in Sanskrit plays, poetry and prose--both literary and inscriptional. It presents a general view of the subject with special stress on Sauraseni and Maharastri Prakrit system. The book is divided into two parts. Part I consists of I-XI Chapters which deal with the three periods of Indo-Aryan speech, the three stages of the Middle Period, the literary and spoken Prakrits, their classification and characteristics, their system of Single and Compound Consonants, Vowels, Sandhi, Declension, Conjugation and their history of literature. Part II consists of a number of extracts from Sanskrit and Prakrit literature which illustrate different types of Prakrit--Sauraseni, Maharastri, Magadhi, Ardhamagadhi, Avanti, Apabhramsa, etc., most of which are translated into English. The book contains valuable information on the Phonetics and Grammar of the Dramatic Prakrits--Sauraseni and Maharastri. It is documented with an Index as well as a Students' Bibliography.
  

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Contents

PART I
1
General Character of Prakrit
7
Vowels
25
Declension
32
Conjugation
43
Classification of Prakrits
59
Prakrit Literature
80
Extract No 9 Maharastrl Verses from Sattasal
85
Maharastrl SetubandhaBuilding
125
Jain Maharastrl Mandio the Rob
134
Jain Maharastrl Kakkuka Inscrip
146
ArdhaMagadhl UdayanaTrans
156
ArdhaMagadhl KalpasutraThe
168
Magadhl Mrcchakatikam Stha
180
h t 28 Pravacanasara 190191
190
Index of Examples
211

PART II
93
Maharastrl Five Songs from
119
Students Bibliography 231235
231
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Page 3 - we include the Vedic language and all dialects of the Old Indo-Aryan period, then it is true to say that all the Prakrits are derived from Sanskrit. If on the other hand " Sanskrit " is used more strictly of the...
Page 3 - This explanation is perfectly intelligible even if it be not historically correct. Practically we take Sanskrit forms as the basis and derive Prakrit forms therefrom. Nevertheless modern philology insists on an important reservation. Sanskrit forms are quoted as the basis in as far as they represent the old Indo Aryan forms...

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