Mark Twain's Library of Humor (Google eBook)

Front Cover
William Dean Howells
Charles L. Webster & Company, 1888 - American wit and humor - 707 pages
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Review: Library of Humor

User Review  - Emily - Goodreads

Got this while touring the Mark Twain house in Hartford, CT in Sept. Twain is by far the best humor writer (still!) in this collection, though there are great surprises sprinkled throughout. Also has ... Read full review

Review: Library of Humor

User Review  - Al - Goodreads

The edition with Steve Martin's and Roy Blount's introductions is great. It includes Twain's posthumous assessment of the writers who had by then become obscure as "mere humorists" and his note that ... Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
8
III
9
IV
15
V
17
VI
29
VII
31
VIII
33

IX
35
X
48
XI
52
XII
54
XIII
60
XIV
64
XV
69
XVI
74
XVII
82
XVIII
89
XIX
93
XX
97
XXI
100
XXII
104
XXIII
116
XXIV
121
XXV
126
XXVI
129
XXVIII
131
XXIX
136
XXX
139
XXXI
142
XXXII
148
XXXIII
164
XXXIV
166
XXXV
168
XXXVI
178
XXXVII
185
XXXVIII
189
XXXIX
193
XL
196
XLI
197
XLII
204
XLIII
206
XLIV
223
XLV
224
XLVI
225
XLVII
227
XLVIII
229
XLIX
234
L
239
LI
247
LII
256
LIII
258
LIV
278
LV
285
LVI
288
LVII
289
LVIII
292
LIX
300
LX
303
LXI
311
LXII
315
LXIII
324
LXIV
327
LXV
339
LXVI
341
LXVII
348
LXVIII
349
LXIX
359
LXX
362
LXXI
367
LXXII
370
LXXIII
371
LXXIV
378
LXXV
383
LXXVI
386
LXXVII
396
LXXVIII
397
LXXIX
398
LXXX
401
LXXXIX
433
XC
434
XCI
435
XCII
447
XCIII
453
XCIV
454
XCV
458
XCVI
465
XCVII
471
XCVIII
474
XCIX
481
C
484
CI
485
CII
491
CIII
493
CIV
494
CV
495
CVI
498
CVII
505
CVIII
506
CIX
510
CX
511
CXI
519
CXII
525
CXIII
529
CXIV
532
CXV
537
CXVI
538
CXVII
541
CXVIII
542
CXIX
543
CXX
558
CXXI
559
CXXII
561
CXXIII
564
CXXIV
567
CXXV
571
CXXVI
579
CXXVII
583
CXXVIII
584
CXXIX
588
CXXX
592
CXXXI
596
CXXXII
597
CXXXIII
598
CXXXIV
610
CXXXV
611
CXXXVI
627
CXXXVII
631
CXXXVIII
633
CXXXIX
641
CXL
642
CXLI
648
CXLII
649
CXLIII
650
CXLIV
651
CXLV
653
CXLVI
662
CXLVII
664
CXLVIII
666
CXLIX
669
CL
675
CLI
678
CLII
679
CLIII
681
CLIV
682
CLV
683
CLVI
686
CLVII
690
CLVIII
697
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 510 - Fifty-five! This morning the parson takes a drive. Now, small boys, get out of the way! Here comes the wonderful one-hoss shay, Drawn by a rat-tailed, ewe-necked bay. "Huddup!" said the parson.— Off went they. The parson was working his Sunday's text,— Had got to fifthly, and stopped perplexed At what the— Moses— was coming next. All at once the horse stood still, Close by the meet'n'-house on the hill.
Page 160 - Nicholas Vedder?" There was a silence for a little while, when an old man replied, in a thin piping voice, "Nicholas Vedder! why, he is dead and gone these eighteen years! There was a wooden tombstone in the church-yard that used to tell all about him, but that's rotten and gone too.
Page 89 - Which is why I remark, And my language is plain, That for ways that are dark, And for tricks that are vain, The heathen Chinee is peculiar — Which the same I am free to maintain.
Page 361 - O Woman ! in our hours of ease, Uncertain, coy, and hard to please, And variable as the shade By the light quivering aspen made, When pain and anguish wring the brow, A ministering angel thou ! — Scarce were the piteous accents said, When, with the Baron's casque, the maid To the nigh streamlet ran.
Page 155 - Their visages, too, were peculiar; one had a large beard, broad face, and small piggish eyes; the face of another seemed to consist entirely of nose, and was surmounted by a white sugar-loaf hat set off with a little red cock's tail. They all had beards, of various shapes and colors. There was one who seemed to be the commander.
Page 155 - ... countenances, that his heart turned within him, and his knees smote together. His companion now emptied the contents of the keg into large flagons, and made signs to him to wait upon the company. He obeyed with fear and trembling; they quaffed the liquor in profound silence, and then returned to their game.
Page 509 - He would build one shay to beat the taown 'n' the keounty 'n' all the kentry raoun' ; It should be so built that it couldn' break daown : " Fur," said the Deacon, " 't 's mighty plain Thut the weakes' place mus' stan' the strain ; 'n' the way t' fix it, uz I maintain, Is only jest T' make that place uz strong uz the rest.
Page 100 - Zekle crep' up quite unbeknown An" peeked in thru' the winder, An' there sot Huldy all alone, 'Ith no one nigh to hender. A fireplace filled the room's one side With half a cord o' wood in — There warn't no stoves (tell comfort died) To bake ye to a puddin*.
Page 91 - But the hands that were played By that heathen Chinee, And the points that he made, Were quite frightful to see, — Till at last he put down a right bower, Which the same Nye had dealt unto me. Then I looked up at Nye, And he gazed upon me ; And he rose with a sigh, And said, " Can this be? We are ruined by Chinese cheap labour," — And he went for that heathen Chinee.
Page 153 - From even this strong-hold the unlucky Rip was at length routed by his termagant wife, who would suddenly break in upon the tranquillity of the assemblage and call the members all to naught ; nor was that august personage, Nicholas Vedder himself, sacred from the daring tongue of this terrible virago, who charged him outright with encouraging her husband in habits of idleness.

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