The City of Troy and Its Vicinity (Google eBook)

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E. Green, 1886 - Troy (N.Y.) - 376 pages
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Page 318 - ... shall also order General Arnold, upon his return, to march to that fort. I cannot sufficiently thank your Excellency for sending Colonel Morgan's corps to this army ; they will be of the greatest service to it, for until the late successes this way, I am told the army were quite panic-struck by their Indians, and their Tory and Canadian assassins in Indian dresses. Horrible, indeed, have been the cruelties they have wantonly committed upon many of the miserable inhabitants ; insomuch, that all...
Page 71 - September were mild, the rest of the month was cold, with frost, and ice formed a quarter of an inch thick. October was more than usually cold, with frost and ice. November was cold and blustering, with snow enough for good sleighing. December was quite mild and comfortable.
Page 71 - January was mild, as was also February, with the exception of a few days. The greater part of March was cold and boisterous. April opened warm, but grew colder as it advanced, ending with snow and ice and winter cold. In May, ice formed half an inch thick, buds and flowers were frozen, and corn was killed. Frost, ice, and snow were common in June. Almost every green thing was killed, and the fruit was nearly all destroyed. Snow fell to the depth of three inches in New York and Massachusetts, and...
Page 97 - Under this humble stone, are interred the remains of Edmond Charles Genet, late Adjutant General, Minister Plenipotentiary and Consul General from the French Republic to the United States of America. He was born at Versailles, Parish of St. Louis, in France, January 8, 1763, and died at Prospect Hill, Town of Greenbush, July 14, 1834. "Driven by the storms of the Revolution to the shades of retirement, he devoted his talents to his Adopted Country, where he cherished the love of liberty and virtue....
Page 286 - From its present improved state, and the yet more pleasing prospect of its popularity arising from the natural advantages in the mercantile line, it may not be too sanguine to expect, at no very distant period, to see Troy as famous for her trade and navigation as many of our first towns.
Page 318 - the prospect this way appeared most gloomy, but the severe checks the enemy have met with at Bennington and Tryon County, have given a more pleasing view of public affairs. Particular accounts of the signal victory gained by General Stark, and of the severe blow General Herkimer gave Sir John Johnson and the scalpers under his command, have- been transmitted to your Excellency by General Schuyler. I anxiously...
Page 286 - ... fine farms, to Ashley's Ferry, six miles above Albany. On the east side of the river, at this point, a new town has been recently laid out, named Vanderheyden.* This place is situated precisely at the head of navigation on the Hudson. Several bold and enterprising adventurers have already settled here; a number of capacious warehouses, and several dwellings, are already erected. It is favorably situated in reference to the important and growing trade of Vermont and Massachusetts; and I believe...
Page 286 - We passed a valuable tract of 16,000 acres of land, situated on the north side of the river, which has been granted by the state to Baron Steuben. From Schenectady I pursued the road across a thickly settled country, embracing many fine farms, to Ashley's Ferry, six miles above Albany. On the east side of the river, at this point, a new town has been recently laid out, named Vanderheyden.* This place is situated precisely at the head of navigation on the Hudson. Several bold and enterprising adventurers...
Page 17 - An act for the incorporation of building, mutual loan and accumulating fund associations," and the acts amendatory thereof, to wit chap.
Page 121 - Had no opportunity to judge, except by the eye, as we rode along. the platform,, or deck, is cut through, and removed, so as to afford sufficient room, for two horses to stand on the flat surface of the wheel, one horse on each side, and parallel to the gunwale of the boat. The horses are harnessed...

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