Chicago in picture and poetry (Google eBook)

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R.F. Seymour for the Industrial Art League, 1903 - Chicago (Ill.) - 187 pages
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Page 27 - ... Born with a century's birth time and sheltered within a fort; Stript of its roof by savages at the river's lonely port; Driven by demons of whirlwind and a million rushing flames, And smitten by anarchy's reddened hands and a thousand deadly shames, Still upward and onward she marches, with victory on her lips, And a dauntless eye and a strenuous cry to the world that she outstrips.
Page 51 - And the bargain hunter, happy sits, ensconced amid her gains, Complacent o'er the patent fact of her superior brains. The trainman punches tickets with his swift and easy air, Like the man that knows his business of getting every fare; And he calls the Hyde Park station in the strong familiar ring As he inward thrusts his body through the car door's sudden swing. Meanwhile the conversation of the women from the clubs Increases with the train speed and the whirling of the hubs; And the latest sociology...
Page 79 - ... south by a delicately arched iron gate. The north gate is the subject of a sonnet by Horace Spencer Fiske: No porter's lodge along the Oxford High On proctor-shadowed student from his rouse So grimly frowned as thou; nor blackened boughs On Dante losing, hopeless, earth and sky. Thy crocket crawlers scare the helpless eye; Thine anguished corbels twist their human brows; Thy dragon kneelers bend to wicked vows; And high-perched finials threat the passer-by. And yet through such as thou the race...
Page 73 - There has been much football literature, but it is doubtful if the game has inspired a finer ballad than that produced by one of the University's poets, Horace Spencer Fiske. It is a part of the athletic history of the institution. The first stanza and refrain are here given: When the crowd has cheered the hostile teams and the band has played its best, And roaring rooters warmed the lungs within the coldest breast; When hat and cane and flag and feet have marked each rolling shout, And the coin...
Page 157 - And in the midst nf them was Logan, chief not because of his epaulets, but because the command had fallen on one who knew what to do and could not breathe until it was done. He is past all flattery. Shall we call him brave? Others have worn that crimson badge. Great men become types. The people single them out with the ready common sense which belongs to no man but to all men. Logan is our great volunteer. So they have named him. and so will he be known when we are forgotten. Whatever is heroic...
Page 49 - ... engine feels the throttle, as the racer feels the whip, And sends its drivers whirling for its little homeward trip. Oh, the home train and its quiver, and its shoot along the lake, And its gladness that the day is nearly done; And the tumbling of the wave crests as they flash and swiftly break In the last, low, level shining of the sun ! The clean-cut man of business eyes his fresh-bought paper close, Culling out the world's wide doings from the padded news verbose; And the bargain hunter, happy...
Page 25 - Then cheers for the mighty city, As she marches on her way, With her banners high in the smoke-filled sky And her face turned toward the day; {Marching along, two million strong, Three times three cheers for Chica-go!
Page 13 - A tract of forest adjoining was given to the widow of the Indian, Wolf, whose name was applied to the angle of land formed by the junction of the north and south branches of the Chicago river. "Ma-hwa-wa" was the Algonquin word for wolf, so it is the Mohaway Reservation.
Page 179 - Over! the sweet summer closes, The reign of the roses is done; Over and gone with the roses, And over and gone with the sun. Here ; but our sun in Aquitaine lasts longer. I would I were in Aquitaine again your north chills me. Over! the sweet summer closes, And never a flower at the close: Over and gone with the roses, And winter again and the snows.
Page 155 - ... his riven people bending grave, His heart upon the sorrow of the slave, Stands simply strong the kindly man of fate. By war's deep bitterness and brothers' hate Untouched he stands, intent alone to save What God himself and human justice gave, The right of men to freedom's fair estate. In...

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