Pictorial History of King Philip's War: Comprising a Full and Minute Account of All the Massacres, Battles, Conflagrations, and Other Thrilling Incidents of that Tragic Passage in American History : with an Introduction : Containing an Account of the Indian Tribes, Their Manners and Customs (Google eBook)

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H. Wentworth, 1851 - King Philip's War, 1675-1676 - 448 pages
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Contents

I
9
II
46
III
61
IV
73
V
90
VI
96
VII
108
VIII
112
XXIII
214
XXIV
220
XXV
228
XXVI
237
XXVII
243
XXIX
253
XXXI
263
XXXII
274

IX
117
X
130
XI
136
XII
146
XIII
152
XIV
159
XV
165
XVI
171
XVII
180
XVIII
187
XX
194
XXI
200
XXII
208
XXXIII
282
XXXIV
293
XXXV
298
XXXVII
304
XXXVIII
311
XXXIX
322
XL
328
XLI
335
XLII
344
XLIII
363
XLV
373
XLVI
392
XLVIII
409

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Page 144 - William was dead and myself was wounded, she said, "and, Lord, let me die with them", which was no sooner said but she was struck with a bullet and fell down dead over the threshold. I...
Page 26 - In his person he is a very lusty man, in his best years, an able body, grave of countenance, and spare of speech ; in his attire little or nothing differing from the rest of his followers, only in a great chain of white bone beads about his neck; and at it, behind his neck, hangs a little bag of tobacco, which he drank, and gave us to drink. His face was painted with a sad red, like murrey, and oiled both head and face, that he looked greasily.
Page 381 - Church set his men to watch, telling them if they would let him sleep two hours, they should sleep all the rest of the night, he not having slept any for...
Page 446 - Some melancholy fancies would not be persuaded, but that the eclipse falling out at that instant of time was ominous, conceiving also that in the centre of the moon they discerned an unusual black spot, not a little resembling the scalp of an Indian...
Page 352 - It was then considered as the extinction of a virulent and implacable enemy ; it is now viewed as the fall of a great warrior, a penetrating statesman, and a mighty prince. It then excited universal joy and congratulation, as a prelude to the close of a merciless war ; it now awakens sober reflections on the instability of empire, the peculiar destiny of the aboriginal race, and the inscrutable decrees of Heaven.
Page 276 - ... attached to his native soil a prince true to his subjects, and indignant of their wrongs a soldier, daring in battle, firm in adversity, patient of fatigue, of hunger, of every variety of bodily suffering, and ready to perish in the cause he had espoused. Proud of heart, and with an...
Page 330 - A severe and proud dame she was, bestowing every day in dressing herself near as much time as any of the gentry of the land ; powdering her hair and painting her face, going with her necklaces, with jewels in her ears, and bracelets upon her hands. When she had dressed herself, her work was to make girdles of wampum and beads.
Page 399 - Company, and their successors for ever, to be holden of us, our heirs and successors, as of our manor of East Greenwich, in our County of Kent, in free and common soccage, and not in capite...
Page 272 - ... the confederate colonies, as you shall think fit; to discover, pursue, fight, surprise, destroy, or subdue our Indian enemies, or any part or parties of them, that by the providence of God you may meet with, or them, or any of them, by treaty and composition to receive to mercy, if you see reason, (provided they be not murderous rogues, or such as have been principal actors in those villanies...
Page 341 - Hope, where he had retired, with a few of his best friends, into a swamp, which proved but a prison to keep him fast till the messengers of death came by divine permission to execute vengeance upon him.

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