Staying Power: The History of Black People in Britain

Front Cover
University of Alberta, Jan 1, 1984 - History - 632 pages
6 Reviews
Staying Power is recognised as the definitive history of black people in Britain, an epic story that begins with the Roman conquest and continues to this day. In a comprehensive account, Peter Fryer reveals how Africans, Asians and their descendants, previously hidden from history, have profoundly influenced and shaped events in Britain over the course of the last two thousand years.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
4
4 stars
2
3 stars
0
2 stars
0
1 star
0

Review: Staying Power: The History of Black People in Britain

User Review  - Miranda Kaufmann - Goodreads

My review from the BASA Newsletter: 'Peter Fryer, Staying Power', Review, Black and Asian Studies Association Newsletter, 59 (March 2011), pp. 36-7. Fryer's masterly synthesis is still an impressive ... Read full review

Review: Staying Power: The History of Black People in Britain

User Review  - Malcolm - Goodreads

Some 'salvage' history is shaming in the depth and richness of a recent past that it uncovers: Peter Fryer has done us a great service by taking into (intentionally) forgotten aspects of British ... Read full review

Contents

Those kinde of people
1
Necessary Implements
14
Britains slave ports
33
The black community takes shape
67
Eighteenthcentury voices
89
Slavery and the law
113
The rise of English racism
133
Up from slavery 797
191
The settlers7372
372
The new generation
387
A Letter from Olaudah Equiano to Thomas Hardy 1792
403
E J R Archers presidential address to the inaugural meeting
410
F Birmingham the metal industries and the slave trade
417
H Visitors 18321919
432
Prizefighters 17911902
445
Suggestions for further reading
598

Challenges to empire
237
Under attack 7
298

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1984)

Peter Fryer wrote Rhythms of Resistance: African Musical Heritage in Brazil and Black People in the British Empire. He died in 2006, shortly after being awarded the Knight's Cross of the Order of Merit of the Republic by the Hungarian president for his reporting of the Hungarian revolution in 1956.

Bibliographic information