A True and Impartial History of the Conspiracy Against the Person and Government of King William III, of Glorious Memory, in the Year 1695 (Google eBook)

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J. Knapton, 1723 - Great Britain - 196 pages
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Page 63 - And we have all the Reafon in the World to believe that they acted in Public on Scaffolds, or elfe on Theatres erected in private Houfes.
Page 41 - ... qualified for fuch a work, was not fixed upon for this expedition ; for, confidering how well he was known in England, they might juftly apprehend, that his very being in England might alarm the people, who would prefently imagine, that fome mifchief was in agitation, whenever that violent man appeared in this country. Sir George Barclay therefore was chofen as the moft proper perfon to be intrufted with the condudt of this enterprize.
Page 50 - Kew-Ferry, who fhould give notice, when the guards returned thither to wait for the king, to the end that every man might prepare himfelf, and be in readinefs. Having thus fixed on the place, provided their men, and agreed on the order and method of executing their confpiracy, they at laft appointed the time of doing it.
Page 60 - Lowick had faikd them. Then Porter declared, that thefe men, with thofe of Sir George Barclay, would make up forty, which King declared were enough of all confcience to do the bufinefs. Cranburn at his return acquainted them likewife, that Chambers had fent intelligence to Charnock, that the King was to go out a hunting between ten and eleven o'clock, which was communicated and received with great joy ; and then Porter declared, that Pendergrafs was to be one of the eight who were to attack the King's...
Page 56 - ... might change the method and order of their defign, as well as the time and place of execution. And therefore that Mr. Pendergrafs, by difcovering the confpiracy, while he concealed the names of the confpirators...
Page 61 - Rookvvood being at the fame time there, gave Harris a lift of names, and told him laughing, that he would make him his aid de camp. In the lift was Harris's own name, the names of Hare, Hundford, and Blackburn, with captain Rookwood's name at the top. Then Rookwood defired him to get thofe men ready, which he did accordingly.
Page 60 - ... were enough of all confcience to do the bufinefs. Cranburn at his return acquainted them likewife, that Chambers had fent intelligence to Charnock, that the King was to go out a hunting between ten and eleven o'clock, which was communicated and received with great joy ; and then Porter declared, that Pendergrafs was to be one of the eight who were to attack the King's coach ; and faid aloud, that he had a fpecial piece for him, that would carry eight balls. Upon which King in a jocofe manner...
Page 53 - Catholic ; but that he did not think, that any religion could juftify fo treat a wickednefs; and therefore, from principles of chriftianity and probity, he thought himfelf obliged, by revealing the matter, to prevent the king's falling into the hands of the confpirators. But he acquainted him at the fame time, that the confpirators were his friends ; and that from one of them he had received great obligations ; and therefore, though he thought himfelf bound in duty and confcience to make...
Page 34 - Court ; bat the laft were moft confiderable for their aumber and intereft. To humour therefore the laft, the Earl of Middleton, who was fent over to St. Germain's to manage their affairs, was made Secretary of State ; and the Lord Melfort, as if under fome difgrace, was ordered...
Page 31 - ... to prevent their invafion ; for they knew, that a ftrong convoy was ready in England, and had received failing orders to make the beft of their way to reinforce admiral Rooke at Cadiz, whofe fquadron was looked upon as inferior in ftrength to that of the French then putting to fea from Toulon.

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