Vassili Verestchagin: Painter-soldier-traveller, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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R. Bentley & son, 1887
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Page 119 - Behold the fowls of the air ; they sow not, neither do they reap, nor gather into barns ; yet your heavenly Father feedeth them.
Page 203 - Wonderful groves and avenues, the work of years, are sometimes completely destroyed or going rapidly to decay. As you approach the town, it is hard to believe that it is empty : you cannot help hoping to meet some human being, if it be only a robber. But not a soul is to be seen anywhere. The houses are for the most part uninjured, and also the paintings on the walls and on the wooden lattice-work of the windows. Potsherds and fragments of articles of every conceivable kind were lying all about...
Page 203 - Dunghans and Kalmucks side by side with the miniature slippers of Chinese women. I put a pair of extraordinarily small slippers in my pocket as a memento. But above all, skulls are to be seen lying about everywhere. The town is like a vast tomb, and the whole impression it produces is terrible. I wandered about for a whole day in B.'s company, and then for several...
Page 204 - ... and tedious siege, made their way into the fortress. Then began a merciless butchery, in which no one was spared. Skulls and bones lie literally in heaps against the walls here and all around the fortress ; at many points eg by several of the gates the skulls were piled up to a great height. In the fields round the town, too, lie skulls ; as far as the eye can reach, skulls and skulls and again skulls. The wolves and the jackals have already done their work ; the ravens are still engaged...
Page 204 - ... empty. The gate of the fortress, which the besiegers had blown in, is still tolerably strong. Near the gate is to be seen the entrance into the subterranean gallery by which the besiegers, after a long and tedious siege, made their way into the fortress. Then began a merciless butchery, in which no one was spared. Skulls and bones lie literally in heaps against the walls here and all around the fortress ; at many points eg by several of the gates the skulls were piled up to a great height.
Page 222 - One day I went out to make a sketch of the sunset. I prepared my palette, but the sight was so beautiful I waited, delayed the work in order to examine better the sight. Several thousand feet below me all was wrapt in a pure blue shadow ; the summits of the peaks were resplendent in purple flames. I waited, and waited, and would not begin my sketch.
Page 205 - For three whole weeks I lived with one Cossack and one Tartar in a wretched cabin outside the walls of the fortress, and every day from morning till evening I roamed about, looking at everything, drawing and painting.

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