Cyclopedia of universal geography: being a gazetteer of the world : based on the latest censuses, and other authentic sources of information (Google eBook)

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A.S. Barnes, 1855 - History - 856 pages
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Page 459 - Southwark, and Lambeth districts. The two latter are on the south side of the Thames. It contains 300 churches and chapels of the Establishment ; 364 Dissenters' chapels ; 22 foreign chapels ; 250 public schools; 1,500 private schools; 150 hospitals; 156 almshouses, besides 205 other institutions ; 550 public offices ; 14 prisons ; 22 theatres ; 24 markets. Consumes annually 110,000 bullocks, 776,000 sheep, 250,000 lambs, 250,000 calves, and 270,000 pigs; 11,000 tons of butter, 13,000 tons of cheese...
Page 107 - Guise was assassinated. There is here an anc. aqueduct cut in the rock by the Romans. The magnificent dykes for the protection of the valleys from the encroachments of the Loire, one of the most remarkable works of the kind in Europe, commence at Blois. BLOKULLA, a small rocky isl. in the Baltic, between Oeland & the mainland of Sweden. BLOKZYL, a marit.
Page 337 - I had formed from the previous description. Goa is properly a city of Churches; and the wealth of provinces seems to have been expended in their erection. The ancient specimens of architecture at this place far excel any thing that has been attempted in modern times in any other part of the East, both in grandeur and in taste.
Page 202 - SSW. of Venice, on an island at the southern end of the Venetian Lagoon, connected with the mainland by a. stone bridge of 43 arches. It is founded on piles, and has a cathedral : its harbour, the deepest in the Lagoon, is guarded by forts and batteries.
Page 539 - WILLIAM, by the Grace of God, KING OF THE NETHERLANDS, PRINCE OF ORANGE NASSAU, GRAND DUKE OF LUXEMBURG, &c.
Page 387 - The isl. also contains numerous small mud volcanoes & intermittent thermal springs, in the chief of which, the Great Geyser, the water, at a depth of 72 feet, is 30 above the boiling point. No grain of any kind can be raised ; but cabbage and potatoes are cultivated. The flora of Iceland comprises mosses A a few shrubs.
Page 279 - Arabians seized it in the 7th century. The Caliphs possessed it for 2 centuries. In 1250 it came into the power of the Mamelukes, who were subjected to the Turks at the commencement of the 16th century. The French conquered it in 1798; in 1802 they were driven from it by the English, & in 1811 Mehemet Ali rendered himself master of the country by the massacre of the Mamelukes.
Page 58 - Africa & S. America, is but little indented with arms of the ocean, & presents no wide estuaries of rivs. Botany bay, & Jervis' bay are inlets of small size, many of which are met with ; & some of these, with the estuaries of the larger rivers, afford tolerable shelter ; though, upon the whole, the coasts of Australia are deficient in good harbors. In the SE a succession of mntn. ranges stretches from Gipps'-land to lat. 26 S. at a distance from the coast varying generally from 50 to 100 m. Mt....
Page 391 - India, at one time considerable, also yielded to the superior enterprise of the British, and finally the French relinquished the field. In 1625, the first English settlement was made by a company of merchants in a small spot of the Coromandel coast, of five square miles, transferred in 1653 to Madras. A short time previous a settlement had also been obtained at Hooghly, which afterward became the Calcutta station. In 1687, Bombay was erected into a presidency. In 1773, by act of the British Legislature,...
Page 96 - It is compactly built. There is a bridge over the Lehigh 400 feet long ; a female school of a high order, conducted by the Moravians in which many highly respectable ladies of the middle states have received their education. P. 2,989. V. pt., Stark co. 0., on the Turcarawas r. P. 2,019. VI. t., Coshocton co.

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