The Waverly anecdotes: illustrative of the incidents, characters, and scenery described in the novels and romances of Sir Walter Scott, Bart, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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Carter, Hendee, 1833
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Page 226 - When the broken arches are black in night, And each shafted oriel glimmers white ; When the cold light's uncertain shower, Streams on the ruined central tower ; When buttress and buttress, alternately, Seem framed of ebon and ivory...
Page 206 - THE BORDER ANTIQUITIES OF ENGLAND AND SCOTLAND; COMPRISING SPECIMENS OF ARCHITECTURE AND SCULPTURE, AND OTHER VESTIGES OF FORMER AGES, '^ . " ACCOMPANIED BY DESCRIPTIONS. TOGETHER WITH . ,. \^-' ILLUSTRATIONS OF REMARKABLE INCIDENTS IN BORDER HISTORY AND TRADITION, AND ORIGINAL POETRY.
Page 100 - He had borne with little temper the teazing of the courtiers and domestics, and had many squabbles with the king's gigantic porter. At last, being provoked by Mr. Crofts, a young gentleman of family, a challenge ensued: and Mr. Crofts coming to the rendezvous armed only with a squirt, the little creature was so enraged, that a real duel ensued ; and the appointment being on horseback, with pistols, to put them more on a level, Jeffery, at the first fire, shot his antagonist dead.
Page 225 - IF thou would'st view fair Melrose aright, Go visit it by the pale moon-light; For the gay beams of lightsome day Gild, but to flout, the ruins gray.
Page 262 - Through keyholes we do glide; Over tables, stools and shelves, We trip it with our fairy elves.
Page 182 - Nesbit of Dirleton, as he understood that he was very unwell, and himself being now old, and not so stout as he had been, he wished to see him once more before he died. The old man set out by the nearest road, which was by no means his common practice. Next marketday, some of the farmers informed me that they had been in Edinburgh, and seen Will Faa upon the bridge (the South Bridge was not then built) ; that he was tossing about his old brown hat, and huzzaing with great vociferation that he had...
Page 71 - Their fear kythed in this, that multitudes breaking up cellars did cast themselves down there, expecting the enemy's approach. The provost came into one house amongst many, where there were a number lying panting, and desired them to rise for their own defence. They answered, their hearts were away, they would fight no more although they should be killed. And then, although they had been both willing and stout, yet they were unable to resist, for they had cast away all their arms from them by the...
Page 99 - From seven years of age till thirty he never grew taller ; but after thirty he shot up to three feet nine inches, and there fixed. Jeffery became a considerable part of the entertainment of the court. Sir William Davenant wrote a poem called Jeffreidos, on a battle between him and a turkey-cock ;3 and in 1638 was published a very small book called the New Year's Gift...
Page 100 - This happened in France, whither he had attended his mistress in the troubles.* He was again taken prisoner by a Turkish rover, and sold into Barbary. He probably did not remain long in slavery ; for at the beginning of the civil war, he was made a captain in the royal army; and in 1644, attended the Queen of France, where he remained till the restoration.
Page 214 - ... they go out of the field, so that shortly each of them is so content with other that at their departing courteously they will say,

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