Hollywood from Vietnam to Reagan-- and Beyond

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Columbia University Press, 2003 - Performing Arts - 363 pages
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This classic of film criticism, long considered invaluable for its eloquent study of a problematic period in film history, is now substantially updated and revised by the author to include chapters beyond the Reagan era and into the twenty-first century. For the new edition, Robin Wood has written a substantial new preface that explores the interesting double context within which the book can be read-that in which it was written and that in which we find ourselves today. Among the other additions to this new edition are a celebration of modern "screwball" comedies like My Best Friend's Wedding, and an analysis of '90s American and Canadian teen movies in the vein of American Pie, Can't Hardly Wait, and Rollercoaster. Also included are a chapter on Hollywood today that looks at David Fincher and Jim Jarmusch (among others) and an illuminating essay on Day of the Dead.

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Hollywood from Vietnam to Reagan... and beyond

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

In this update of his 1986 book, Wood, who previously authored thoughtful studies on heavyweight film figures like Ingmar Bergman and Alfred Hitchcock, maintains his focus on American moviemaking ... Read full review

Review: Hollywood from Vietnam to Reagan... and Beyond: A Revised and Expanded Edition of the Classic Text

User Review  - Michael Haley - Goodreads

Robin Wood was truly one of the few film critics who mattered, and his insightful, lucid criticism is sorely missed. This book has always been a favorite, and no matter how many times I look at it, it ... Read full review

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About the author (2003)

Robin Wood is a founding editor of CineAction and author of Hitchcock's Films Revisited (Revised Edition, Columbia, 2002) and Sexual Politics and Narrative Film (Columbia, 1998). He is professor emeritus at York University and the recipient of a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Society for Cinema Studies.

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