The workwoman's guide, containing instructions in cutting out and completing articles of wearing apparel, by a lady (Google eBook)

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1840
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Page iii - That not to know at large of things remote From use, obscure and subtle, but to know That which before us lies in daily life, Is the prime wisdom...
Page 234 - The first is to beat sal ammoniac into a fine powder, then to moisten it with soft water, rubbing it on the ornaments, which must be heated over charcoal, and rubbed dry with bran and whiting. The second is to wash the brass work...
Page 235 - Take a piece of flannel, dip it in the milk, then rub off a good quantity of soap to the wetted flannel, and commence to rub the glove downwards towards the fingers, holding it firmly with the left hand. Continue this process until the glove, if white, looks of a dingy yellow, though clean: if coloured, till it looks dark and spoiled.
Page 288 - As fast as it is worked it is rolled on a cylinder of wood. When it is finished, the projecting ends and ears are cut off; it is then passed with force between the hand and a piece of wood, cut with a sharp edge to press and polish it. The tresses, thus prepared, ' are used so that a complete hat shall be formed of one piece. They are sewed together with raw silk. The diameter of the hat is in general the same, the only difference consists in the degree of fineness, and, consequently, the number...
Page 221 - To take out Mildew. Mix soft soap with starch powdered, half as much salt, and the juice of a lemon ; lay it on the part on both sides with a painter's brush. Let it lie on the grass day and night till the stain comes out.
Page 288 - To take thirteen straws and tie them together at one end, then to divide them into a right angle, placing six straws on the left side, and seven on the right. The seventh or outermost on the right, is to be turned down by the finger and thumb of the right hand, and brought up under two straws, over two, and under two, and seven straws will then be placed on the left side of the angle.
Page 232 - Provide a plate with some of the best whiting to be had, and have ready some clean warm water and a piece of flannel, which dip into the water and squeeze nearly dry; then take as much whiting as will adhere to it, apply it to the -painted surface, when a little rubbing will instantly remove any dirt or grease. After which wash the part well with clean water, rubbing it dry with a soft chamois.
Page 235 - Kid Gloves. Have ready a little new milk in one saucer, and a piece of brown soap in another, and a clean cloth or towel folded three or four times. On the cloth, spread out the glove smooth and neat. Take a piece of flannel, dip it in the milk, then rub off a good quantity of soap to the wetted flannel, and commence to rub the glove downwards towards the fingers, holding it firmly with the left hand. Continue this process until the glove, if white, looks of a dingy yellow, though clean ; if...
Page 231 - AKE raw potatoes, in the state they are taken out of the earth, wash them well, then rub them on a grater over a vessel of clean water to a fine pulp, pass the liquid matter through a coarse sieve into another tub of clear water ; let the mixture stand till the fine white particles of the potatoes are precipitated, then pour the mucilaginous liquor from the fecula, and preserve this liquor for use.
Page 288 - ... being done, it is bleached alternately by the dew and the sunshine. Rain is very injurious to it, and destroys much of its whiteness. When a sudden shower comes on, every one is in motion gathering up the straw. The lower parts of the straw are treated in the same manner, and employed in forming mats of an inferior quality. The upper parts, torn off just to the knot, are sorted according to their degree of fineness. This stapling is made with much care, and usually affords straw of three different...

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