Press and Media Access to the Criminal Courtroom

Front Cover
Quorum Books, 1988 - Law - 129 pages
0 Reviews

To what extent should media coverage of criminal court proceedings be permitted? The central issue is how to strike a balance between the public's right to information and the individual's right to privacy. Freedman reviews the underlying legal principles and constitutional issues and describes important case law. He analyzes situations in which photographing, broadcasting, and televising in the courtroom are currently allowed and examines the relationship between the presence of media equipment during criminal trials and the actions of trial lawyers. The issue of media coverage as it relates to civil trials is also addressed, and British practices regarding press and media coverage of court proceedings are offered for comparison. "Legal Information Alert"

Freedman here presents a comprehensive discussion of an issue of growing importance to both the legal profession and the communications industry: the extent to which media coverage of criminal court proceedings should be permitted. As Freedman points out, the central question is how to strike the appropriate balance between the public's right to information and the individual's right to privacy. In "Press and Media Access to the Criminal Courtroom," he reviews the underlying legal principles and constitutional issues, describes the important cases that have shaped current legal thinking, and provides citations of the applicable case law.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The First Amendment and Freedom of Press ll
11
The Sixth Amendment and the Fair Trial Guarantee
23
Closure of the Criminal Courtroom
31
Copyright

7 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1988)

WARREN FREEDMAN has written more than 45 legal treatises, more than 100 law review articles, served as State Trial Referee in Connecticut and a Hearing Examiner in New York, and continues to lecture at various educational and legal forums. He served as an Attorney Examiner with the Federal Trade Commission, a member of the faculty of Rutgers University School of Law, practiced law in his own New Rochelle, New York law firm, and for many years was assistant secretary and legal counsel of Bristol-Myers Squibb Co.